Small Wonder

Cultural Continuum 3-29-19

Mar 29, 2019

One Book One Siouxland has many events starting in April, also Small Wonders writer Jim Schaap does some live readings and book signings. Vangarde is very busy with the blues and NISO's spring concert features the "King of Instruments".

The Exchange 010919 

Promo

Coming up next on The Exchange, the partial government shutdown is compound the effect of the ongoing trade war with China for corn and soybean farmers, who may not get vital market reports this month.

Todd

Also, a look at the upcoming Iowa legislative session and Jim Schaap takes a look back at the Children’s Blizzard of 1888 on another Small Wonder.  That and more coming up on The Exchange, 

BB

Intro



  


Audio FileThe Exchange, December 19, 2018Edit | Remove

  The Exchange 121918 

Coming up next on The Exchange, we celebrate the holiday season.  I talk with Morningside College professor Emeritus Bruce Fobes about the history of Christmas and preview a live, radio play production of A Christmas Carol, and we hear a new Small Wonder from Jim Schaap.





Audio FileThe Exchange, 11/21/18Edit | Remove

  

  The Exchange 112118

Coming up on The Exchange, we learn about the changes made in the state’s child welfare system in how it works with Native American foster children.  


Also, a constitutional lawyer talks about the role of often embattled special prosecutors.


James C Schaap

We were standing atop a miniature mountain, looking out over the Big Sioux River from a statuesque bluff not all that far from the confluence of the Missouri and the Big Sioux, over the prairie land of Broken Kettle Grasslands Preserve, 3000 acres of sheer beauty.  No one else was there.

James C Schaap

Legend has it that back in the fifties, when the county spread blacktop over the gravel on the road straight west to the South Dakota border, one farmer held out. “That cottonwood,” they told him, “is going to have to go before the road goes in. He’s too blasted close to the roadbed. Look there at the way he hangs over.”

Farmer shook his head, said no way. Farmer said he loved that tree, cottonwood or not, tallest one on his place, best shade too; and you know what?-- he could give a fig for that blacktop because who needs the traffic out here anyway?

O'Brien County Historical Society

Charles and Caroline Ingalls notwithstanding, some of our pioneer forbearers regularly ran afoul of the law, even though they were the law, the only law.

Once the federal government declared the land of the Yanktons, the land beneath my feet, was no longer the Yanktons and therefore open for settlement, the first white faces to make their way here were shysters. No one like them on Little House. All they cared about were the empty spaces this country might fill up in their own ledger books.

My Father's Tears

Oct 2, 2017
Dorothea Lange

It's a simple human story, repeated countless times in countless settings.

It begins with absolute necessity of very hard work and the will power to get it done, an ethic white rural folks have celebrated proudly for 150 years--"that kid really knows how to work."

At 98, barely able to walk, my father-in-law still apologizes for having done nothing all day in the Home. That laziness grieves him. He dreams of working all afternoon--doesn't really matter how, as long as he sweats. You know?

Palace of the Governors Collections, Museum of New Mexico

It’s hard to know where to start because the roots of this incredible story originate all around the world.

That there were Frenchmen here long, long ago will surprise no one. The French arrived not long after the Sioux showed up—fur trappers, hundreds of them, and their dealers, men with largely unpronounceable names like Sioux City’s own founding father, Theophile Brugeiur.

How long ago? Ages. Ben Franklin, the Ben Franklin was 14. George Washington wasn’t even born—and wouldn’t be for a dozen years, Thomas Jefferson for 23. Early, early, early.

Minnesota Historical Society

This story begins in a South Dakota graveyard just outside a town that has, these days, far more ghosts than spirit. I was looking for a man's grave and surprised when I found it. The truth? --there are far more dead in that cemetery than alive in town.

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