Jim Schaap

Cultural Continuum 9.10.21

Sep 10, 2021

Late summer activities and the cultural scene shows no signs of slowing down. The Sioux City Railroad Museum bids adieux to their RR storyteller series for the summer. The Langley's play a Grandparents Day show at the Betty Strong Encounter Center and SPM want's you to tell us what you want to hear.

This week on The Exchange, we hear the details of a new lawsuit filed against the state of Iowa over it’s ban on mask mandates in public schools.  

Also, how to wean yourself off your electronic devices, because you may not realize you are addicted.

And we talk with some of the artists from last weekend’s ArtSplash event, and also with the one of co-founders of the Sioux City International Film Festival that is coming up in October.

We also talk with the artist who painted a new mural on West 7th Street in Sioux City.

James C. Schaap

I'm lucky to have grabbed a shot of my neighbor last night. The dickcissels behind our place are not particularly rare, and I love having them back again when they arrive in early summer. They're no bigger than a parakeet, and the endless ratcheting they make seems to make them almost akin. To call what they do "singing" is a stretch. It's a bleat, rough and horse, nothing like the robins’ varied melodies. 

On some balmy early fall days out here on the edge of the plains, it’s not hard to believe that we are not where we are. Warm southern breezes sweep all the way up from the Gulf, the sun smiles with a gentleness not seen since June, and the spacious sky reigns over everything in azure glory.

On exactly that kind of fall morning, I loved bringing my writing classes to what I call a ghost town, Highland, Iowa, a place whose remnants still exist, eight miles west and two south, a village that is no more.

This week on The Exchange, we speak with the author of a new book who tells of his first-hand experience in the oil fields in the boom town of Williston, North Dakota.  Michael Patrick  says his book looks at people who are often surviving financially from week to week. 

We also talk about one of the country’s first carbon capture and storage projects that is associated with an ethanol plant in Marcus, Iowa.  Bruce Rastetter is the CEO of Summit. He says the partnership is a giant step forward for the biofuels industry.

Jim Schaap of Small Wonders and Siouxland Public Media's General Manger Mark Munger bring stories of Christmas to lighten our load in these difficult days.

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This week on The Exchange, we hear the story of Ponca tribe chief Standing Bear. Siouxland Public Media and Small Wonders' Jim Schaap has been telling Standing Bear's story in a four-part series. We will hear that series today.

This week on The Exchange, what citizens may have to do to move the US to a universal health care system.  Nearly every other wealthy, developed country in the world has already done so.   Rosemarie Day is the author of new book on the subject.  She helped run the Massachusetts version of the Affordable Care Act.  

 

This week on The Exchange, we talk with Republican Senator Joni Ernst and her opponent Theresa  Greenflield.  Both candidates have been raising record levels of campaign funds, and recent polls show Ernst and Greenfield in a very tight race.

Also on the program,  the Sioux City Council this week approved the purchase of body cameras after years of debate.  Supporters say the re-evalution of police tactics and equipment after the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May was a motivating factor in their decision..

And, we talk with an author about why community 

On this edition of The Exchange, we talk with Tyler Brock of Siouxland District Health about the number of COVID-19 cases in Woodbury County and how to keep ourselves safe during the pandemic.

We also speak with Sioux City Community Schools Superintendent Paul Gausman about the outlook for students, who are currently out of school because of the coronavirus, to get back to class this school year.

This week on The Exchange, 

Presidential candidate and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg meets with potential caucus-goers in Siouxland.  We have a report.

Also, some of the Democratic candidates who are vying for an opportunity to oust US Senator Joni Ernst next year say they feel the impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump should go forward.

Coming up this week on The Exchange,

We hear from Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds who was in Siouxland yesterday to open a new fiber-optic network center downtown. She also met up with teachers and students in a Western Iowa Tech program that teaches students how to build homes.   It’s part of the Future Ready Iowa Initiative.

A report on the needs of the nurses at Mercy One, who are involved in a contract dispute with their employer.   

We talk with a Siouxland native who has created an app to help farmers monitor the health of their pigs.

Cultural Continuum 9-20-19

Sep 20, 2019

Western Iowa Tech's GLOW Festival is tonight with DAD playing their last show of the year, there's a HAMFEST as well as a Bacon Fest, Akron hosts a Scarecrow Festival, Nature Calls is at the Convention Center, Jim Schaap gives a talk and The Exchange presents a Sioux City Council Candidate Forum at the library.

This week on The Exchange, 

We talk with the five city council candidates that will compete in the primary election on October 8th.

Also, a discussion with comedian Lewis Black who performs this weekend at the Orpheum in Sioux City.

We get a preview of Friday’s GlowFest at Western Iowa Tech Community College.

And Jim Schaap who we hear often talking about Small Wonders will talk about the beauty and majesty of the Loess Hills, and give us a preview of a live event next week at the Broken Kettle Grasslands Reserve.

Cultural Continuum 3-29-19

Mar 29, 2019

One Book One Siouxland has many events starting in April, also Small Wonders writer Jim Schaap does some live readings and book signings. Vangarde is very busy with the blues and NISO's spring concert features the "King of Instruments".

The Exchange 022019 

This week on The Exchange, are you a helicopter parent?  A new study says you are laying the groundwork for future success, but doesn’t work the same way for everyone.

Also, we hear from some legends of the civil rights movement. That’s coming up on The Exchange Wednesday at noon and Friday at 3:00 on SPM.

Intro

You’re listening to The Exchange on SPM; I’m Mary Hartnett.  Today we talk with a researcher who’s new study shows the individual benefits and perhaps the societal discrepancies involved with helicopter parenting.  But first, 





Audio FileThe Exchange, 11/21/18Edit | Remove

  

Coming up on The Exchange, we learn about the changes made in the state’s child welfare system in how it works with Native American foster children.  

Also, a constitutional lawyer talks about the role of often embattled special prosecutors.

  The Exchange 080118. 

Coming up next on The Exchange, President Donald Trump has put tariffs on commodities like corn, soybeans and steel, to help even out America’s trade deficit with China.  However, Iowa farmers are already feeling the pain with lower prices and fears for the future.

Also, the sounds of the upcoming African Night.

And another Small Wonder with Jim Schaap.  That and more coming up on The Exchange, but first, this news.

Introduction

Welcome to the Exchange, on Siouxland Public Media, I’m Mary Hartnett. 

What happened in the lumber town of Hinckley, Minnesota, on September 1, 1894, was beyond horror.  Four hundred white men, women, and children died, as well as countless Ojibwa in the pine forests all around.  It's probably impossible to know how many human beings died in total, since more than a few transient logging camp workers from as far away as Nebraska were simply never accounted for. 

James Schaap

A full rack of ribs, with beans and slaw, will cost you twenty bucks at Buffalo Chip Saloon and Bar, Cave Creek, AZ. Sounds reasonable, even inviting. But seriously, who'd want to eat anything served up at a saloon named by way of ruminant excrement?

Jim Schaap

What’s there today is more of a grave than a memorial. Once upon a time—well, for more than 100 years—an obelisk stood mightily atop that chunk of granite, rose twenty feet into the air above the Missouri River.

But the obelisk is gone. A naked steel bolt reminds you that something once stood there. But then, maybe that’s okay. The issues aren’t mine to determine.

The WPA in Le Mars

Jun 14, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Once upon a time, twenty-five buildings were built just outside of LeMars, Iowa, at a fancy recreation complex/golf course, a facility otherwise unheard of in the area, each building blessed with the very same Kasota limestone veneer, a building material so weather-averse that the collection at Willow Creek looks as if they’ve never yet seen a Siouxland storm.

The Willa Cather Foundation

So it turns out, finally, that much of the trip you might take to Catherland, to south-central Nebraska, where Willa Cather grew up, tends to trace the life of one of her own central characters, Antonia Shimerda, from My Antonia, itself a hymn to the prairie. It’s as much about Antonia as it is about Willa.

Collateral Damage

May 29, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Karen Edelman Williams had never been here before, never seen unending fields of corn and soybeans amid the tawny prairie grass, never seen anything like the yawning openness all around. So when, sometime later, she wrote a letter to those people she’d met on a visit out here, she told them she’d never forget the place. “I will never forget the kindness of the people we met there,” she told them, “or the beauty of your Nebraska skies.”

Wessels Living History Farm

Even though I must have been through the place a thousand times, I didn't even know it was a place--James, Iowa, just up the road from Leeds. From up above on Google Earth, James, looks more like a camp ground than a suburb; but right there on highway 75, it sits peacefully alongside the meandering Floyd, far southern Plymouth County. 

Truth is, this story has little to do with James, Iowa. The town merits mention only as a setting, as in, "this whole business went down right here in James, Iowa." Nobody in James had a thing to do with it.

Minnesota Historical Society

This story begins in a South Dakota graveyard just outside a town that has, these days, far more ghosts than spirit. I was looking for a man's grave and surprised when I found it. The truth? --there are far more dead in that cemetery than alive in town.

Sweethearts on the Prairie

May 1, 2017

In the barest of outlines, their getting together seems a marriage of convenience. If you stop at the Homestead Monument, you might just think the gravestone up on the hill marks something cold. Pioneers like Daniel Freeman were incapable of expressing their feelings, if they have feelings at all. Isn’t that right?

Besides, old Daniel had to be flat out lonely. The Civil War was finally over and he’s got a place of his own, a homestead, first one anywhere. What he needs is woman.

I'm thinking you have to be of a certain age, a certain vintage, to use a word like ungodly with any seriousness. For added bluster, sure, as in, "It was ungodly cold last night, wasn't it?" That was it as an adjective, an add-on. "Who on earth made this ungodly mess?" You know.

But the word ungodly lost currency as a noun long ago, a usage that was once theological and judgmental. Fifty years ago, it didn't matter if you were Protestant or Catholic, you knew very well who the "ungodly" were: they were them and not us.

Sioux County, Iowa
Ally Karsyn

 

He claimed hundreds of undocumented immigrants from Mexico have “calves the size of cantaloupes because they’re hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert.” He advocated for an electrified fence along the United States-Mexico border to discourage crossings, adding, “We do that with livestock all the time.”

 

Cultural Continuum 2-10-17

Feb 10, 2017
Sioux City Journal

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