African American

A Family Plot

Sep 30, 2019
Jim Schaap

There's no fort there anymore. Unlike Laramie or Robinson or Scott or Wingate, where you can still almost hear the history, Ft. Randall has only a busted-up chapel and a long, thin graveyard. If a state highway didn't run right by, no one would ever stop and only a few would remember. 

Fort Randall's claim to fame is having held Sitting Bull and his people when they returned, entirely diminished, from Canada some few years after Little Big Horn. Once upon a time, the legendary Sitting Bull was incarcerated right here. 

NAACP

Feb 28, 2019
Mary Hartnett

February is Black History Month, and the NAACP of Sioux City has been holding

special events to honor those who have contributed to the welfare of the African

American Community.  Sunday afternoon, siouxlanders gathered at the Sioux City

Public Museum for a conversation about diversity and equal rights, hosted by the

Sioux City branch of the NAACP.

Wikimedia Commons

  

By the time American troops got to Europe in 1917, African-Americans had an established, but not celebrated history in military service of our country. In 1862, under the direction of Thomas Wentworth Higgenson, the sworn abolitionist and literary heartthrob of Emily Dickinson, the first federally authorized Black military unit, the First South Carolina Volunteers, went to war.

Hammerin' Hank

Feb 19, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

He was just 23 years old when, in 1957, he won the MVP award. I was in third grade, and hard as it might be to believe, I don't think I thought of him as Black. He'd come up from the Negro league in fact, the very last player to arrive in the Bigs, at a time when African-Americans were just beginning to get a place in major league baseball dugouts. 

Seems to me that Billy Bruton played next to him in centerfield, so he wasn't the only African-American on the roster. But he was early. Those old pics of that 1957 team--World Champ Milwaukee Braves!--have four or five others.

Briar Cliff University

Tonight the Sanford Center will hold an event at the Orpheum Theatre featuring Mitch and Emily Martin, Play It Forward, Kevin Keane, and more. The Center itself has served the Siouxland Community since the 1930’s, beginning as a settlement house for African Americans migrating north. Over time, its role in the community has expanded: setting up affordable, educational daycare; going into schools to help students and diminish gang presence; feeding families. Much of this growth happened under the directorship of George Boykin.