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This was most of America's introduction to nuclear power.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Updated September 11, 2021 at 1:02 PM ET

On a recent day in Irvine, Calif., Ali Malik is looking for his son Layth's shoes to get ready to go to an arcade.

Layth is 5 and his brother, Muhammad Binyamin (they call him Binyamin) is 9.

The Sept. 11 attacks happened well before their lives began. So they don't fully understand how it changed so much for this country, led to two American invasions, occupations and wars. And they also don't know how it changed their dad.

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Johnson & Johnson says it has evidence that people who got the company's COVID-19 vaccine could benefit from a booster. NPR health correspondent Rob Stein joins us now with the details. Hi, Rob.

ROB STEIN, BYLINE: Good morning.

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We have a report from a way station for people evacuated from Afghanistan.

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TOKYO — They were called the "COVID Olympics." The "pandemic Olympics." The "anger Olympics." Many Japanese people were upset to host such a huge and risky event in the middle of the pandemic, and many outside observers were surprised it happened at all.

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A new film tells the story of an American student studying abroad in France. She ends up in prison, accused of murdering her roommate. And her father, played by Matt Damon, goes on a pursuit to prove her innocence. If the story sounds familiar, it's because, as Vanity Fair put it, the director, Tom McCarthy, was, quote, "directly inspired by the Amanda Knox saga," a phrase Knox says inaccurately frames the truth about what happened.

TOKYO — American BMX racer and three-time Olympian Connor Fields is expected to be released from a Tokyo hospital on Thursday and fly home to the United States.

Fields, who won a gold medal at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, was racing in an Olympic BMX semifinal heat on July 30 when he crashed face first and suffered a brain hemorrhage and broken rib.

TOKYO — We're in the home stretch of the most dramatic Olympics in recent memory, held against great odds amid a global pandemic in a country where many Japanese residents didn't want it to happen at all.

TOKYO — The International Olympic Committee said it's looking into a U.S. athlete's decision to defy a ban on protesting while on the medal podium in Tokyo.

U.S. shot-putter Raven Saunders briefly held her arms above her head in the shape of an X after accepting her silver medal. The ceremony was over; China's anthem to honor gold medalist Gong Lijiao was complete.

When U.S. shot putter Raven Saunders is competing, she calls herself the "Hulk." It's the alter ego that bursts onto the field to fight for championships.

Saunders — with the help of her "Hulk" persona — took silver in the women's shot put final at the Tokyo Summer Olympics. She hurled the heavy ball 19.79 meters, or nearly 65 feet. It's the third medal ever for the U.S. in the women's event and it's Saunders' first.

TOKYO — Today, Reshmi Oogink finally gets to go home.

But it won't be the homecoming in the Netherlands she expected after the Tokyo Olympics.

She was aiming to showcase her skills in Taekwondo. This would have been her second Olympics representing her county.

TOKYO — American BMX racer Connor Fields remains in a Tokyo hospital after a crash on Friday at the Olympics. Today officials from USA Cycling revealed Fields sustained a brain hemorrhage and broke a rib during his semifinals heat.

During the race, Fields slammed headfirst into the ground following a jump that was leading into his first turn. He remained motionless after the crash. Medics rushed him off the course on a stretcher and into an ambulance.

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TOKYO — They call him downtown Ira Brown.

His three pointers got him the nickname. For years he's played professional basketball in Japan. But he never dreamed he'd get to the Olympic stage.

"Not in a million years," he said, shaking his head and laughing.

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