Schaap

Things We Couldn't Say

Jun 21, 2016

Following Holland's fall to Hitler's army, Diet Eman's Jewish friend Herman was told to report for transport. Upon hearing this, she and her fiance, Hein Sietsma, made the decision to risk their lives for their beliefs. Diet and Hein would later be sent to concentration camps for their acts of resistance, and Hein would indeed lose his life. Diet survived. She came to the United States and made her home in Michigan following the war, and she began to tell her story. The author James Schaap happened to be one of her listeners, and, taken by her story, offered to be her biographer.

That Saturday morning what me and my camera wanted to get was a couple of fine shots of gravestones adorned in the long, early morning shadows. I headed out to the Doon cemetery, where the stones hug a rolling hill above the Rock River, a setting that offers a cemetery more wordless gravitas than graveyards ordinarily have.

The Lit of Siouxland

Mar 16, 2015
orangecityarts.net

In talking with Dr. James Schaap about the books to be read in Siouxland 101, we cannot help but land upon the hardships of old times: grasshopper infestations, prairie fires, the unrelenting hand of nature. Walls of devastation that fell upon the early European settlers of Siouxland, that left families prostrated on the hard ground as their livelihood was lost, do not now, however, register in our list of daily fears.

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