Civil War

The Exchange 05.22.19

You’re listening to the Exchange on SPM, I’m MH.

The House last week passed a $19 billion disaster aid bill that would deliver long-sought relief to farmers, victims of hurricanes and floods, and rebuild southern military bases, as Democrats try to dislodge the legislation from a Senate logjam over aid to hurricane-slammed Puerto Rico.

Today we hear about some efforts by the federal government, the air national Guard and a local solar power vendor to help those devastated in Puerto Rico in the aftermath of a hurricane in 2017.  

Abraham Lincoln took office as the 16th president of the United States on March 4, 1861.  

The next month, the first shots of the Civil War sounded at Fort Sumter in South Carolina.  

The community of Spencer, Iowa is remembering the veterans of this deadly conflict.  

“This new exhibit it’s called “Boys in Blue, Grand Army of the Republic,” said Stephanie Horsley.  

Walking into a wing of the Clay County Heritage Center transports you to a time of turmoil for the United States starting in April of 1861.

Wikimedia Commons

Seems easy enough, simple and true: once you're free, that’s it--no going back. Free at last. Makes sense.

Well, not so. In the case of more than one slave and former slave, being free for a time, or having been free for months or even years, was not a ticket to ride because by law in these United States it was altogether possible and perfectly legal for a free man or woman to be returned to an owner and thus chained up once more, improbable as that may seem.

Battle of the Spurs

Aug 13, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

There's something vintage Old Testament about the whole story, something that feels like myth. But it happened; and just a bit north of Topeka, an unkept highway marker up on a hill tells part of the story that can't be doubted. What can is far more fascinating.

Caroline Fraser says that what Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote down about Kansas, long ago, says a great deal about her, even though the Kansas prairie was home to her very first memories. She wrote those memories down on "Big Chief" tablets and never intended them for publication, unlike so much else she put to writing. Just for the record, Caroline Fraser's Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder, just won the Pulitzer. It's a great read.

Wikimedia Commons

President Woodrow Wilson, like each and every President--and all of us--was a bundle of contradictions, his very soul a nest of hooks. From the time he was a kid, he wanted to be in government. A portrait of Gladstone hung in his boyhood bedroom, and he made no bones about it--he wanted to be a statesman.

Bleeding Kansas

Feb 26, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Since 1920, the Osawatomie/Paola game was the Super Bowl, the game no one missed, the big one that shut down both Kansas towns and most the countryside. For 93 years it went on.

But the rivalry got started long before that, if you read the history. For a time in the 1850s, those two burgs did a whole lot more than mount great passing games. Kansas was bleeding in the 1850s. Just about everyone opening up the sod on the new state's eastern edge did so because they wanted to fight, wanted to win, sometimes at all costs. 

Cultural Continuum 2-02-18

Feb 2, 2018

Siouxland Public Media has two events happening Friday night! Ode celebrates its 2nd anniversary at ISU Design West, and the Morningside College Piano Recital Series presents fortepianist Krisian Bezuidenhout at Eppley and over the air as another Siouxland Arts Live event. Foodbank of Siouxland presents Empty Bowls and lots, lots more!

Religious visions were everywhere in the years preceding the Civil War. Boom towns out west here may have been hell holes for a time, but they were also peopled by starry-eyed believers who claimed their marching orders came from on high.

Tabor, Iowa, sits on a bluff far above the Missouri, the highest point of Fremont County. The place is not in terrific shape today; but Tabor has an epic past, created when fiery abolitionist Congregationalists set up camp here, just across the river from Nebraska.