Art

Sioux City Art Center

Jerry Uelsmann is a master of the darkroom who, before the creation of image editing software, saw the possibilities of combining photographic images from separate exposures into a single, seamless composition. Because of his deftness, when we look at his images from a context where digital editing is expected, we still feel a sense of awe and wonder.

Sioux City Art Center

"The light that Paul makes us feel... gives us that sense that [Martin Luther King, Jr.] is both coming forward and going back at the same time," says Behrens. "What he creates is something so unexpected." As you look deeply into this familiar image, you find that what you see is more illusive and that there are shapes and ideas within that don't conform to one's understanding. 

Martin Luther King, Jr. is on display in the Sioux City Art Center's Permanent Collection On View exhibition. 

Food For Thought - 10-05 Erin Webber-Dreeszen

Oct 5, 2018
Sioux City Journal

Fancy Watermelons, ice sculptures, beer, wine and cheese galore! It's all part of Artilicious which exists ostensibly to show people what is available for fall and winter catering at HyVee, but it's also a great way to get people in the door and think about art for awhile.

Sioux City Art Center

"The best way of approaching every experience that you have on a daily basis is with a freshness, with an openness, and to try to make sense of what is in front of you, rather than bringing all or your preconceptions to something," says Todd Behrens, curator at the Sioux City Art Center while looking at DELL (ray), a work by James Shrosbree, a painting that welcomes its viewers by first rejecting their past experiences.

Sioux City Art Center

In Julie Blackmon's Crystal Ball, the uncanny representation or reality reveals deep truths about parenthood. The Sioux City Art Center's Todd Behrens takes us into this photograph where expectations become a medium for building understanding.   

Join us every Wednesday morning as we explore the collection of the Sioux City Art Center.

Sioux City Art Center

It's a way to paint something as it really looks, but it's not what your conscious brain is really telling you it should look like, because there shouldn't be all these colors.

Todd Behrens, Curator at the Sioux City Art Center, begins our series exploring art with a still life that reveals an odd gap existing between what we think we see and what we really see. 

Mix Tape Dance Party: Art Show 08/27/18

Aug 29, 2018

  On this ArtSplash-inspired edition of MTDP, we'll salute musical artists, who are not afraid to color outside of the lines. We'll hear everybody from The Ramones to Florence and the Machine; The Flaming Lips to The Yeah, Yeah, Yeahs.

E Pluribus Unum, out of many, one—the motto of the United States. So, how does that get applied to art?

Don't remember where I heard it, but the conversation wasn't directed at me.  I must have been sitting somewhere among a whole group of people when I overheard a mom telling someone else about her boy, how he was really into his own music, how he was in three or four bands and had already produced his own CDs, how he was going to make music his career, wanted to be a singer/songwriter.

Sure, I thought. He and a half million others. Maybe more.

"That's all he lives for these days," she was saying, or something to that effect. She was proud of him, and I was cynical.

This is Jenn Delperdang, with the Sioux City Public Library and you're listening to Check It Out. Today, I am recommending the trilogy of children's books written and illustrated by Peter H.

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