Siouxland Media Lab

Varies

Siouxland Media Lab brings the tools of public broadcasting to the youth and underserved in Sioux City. With the help of a Gilchrist Grant, we are now meeting regularly with up-and-coming public radio producers and reporters at Girls Inc. of Sioux City and the Mary J Treglia Community House. 

Facebook- Kim Sitzmann

Presidential candidate Kamala Harris is in Siouxland this afternoon.  After a stop at the Anderson Dance Pavilion last night she’s expected in Storm Lake in about an hour.   

More than 100 people showed up at the riverfront in Sioux City to hear her 3 a.m. agenda.  Those are issues keeping people up at night,  according to the U.S. Senator from California.

“How will we fight for the America we believe in?"   

"So, we can solve the problems that people face every single day.”

The Interviewer becomes the Interviewee

Aug 7, 2019
Siouxland Public Media

The summer members of Girls Inc. took part in the Siouxland Media Lab to get a feel for the world of broadcasting. 

In this occasion, Tina flew solo and had the opportunity to tour a local television and talk to one of Sioux City’s most popular news anchors, Larry Wentz.  Larry talked about his career, memorable stories and even his favorite music.  Usually, he’s the one doing the interview.

Special thanks to Siouxland Public Media’s Jorge Quezada for helping produce this segment and for leading the Siouxland Media Lab project. 

Girls Inc

We sat down with Mandy Engel-Cartie, executive director of Girls Inc. In this interview she talks about her perspective of Girls Inc. and about her position. 

Kid Talk: Ruby's Conversation with Inge Auerbacher

Apr 11, 2019

Ruby:  Do you ever like to try to draw the pictures of your past experiences?

Inge:  No, I'm not a good artist no. You know what I say, I paint with words.

Ruby: That's a good way to word it.

Ruby, host of this episodes Kid Talk, interviews Inge Auberbacher who is a Holocaust-survivor and author of the the book I Am a Star. The interviews was conducted in honor of Tolerance Week. 

Alexis:  Technology....for better or for worse is here to stay...giving us instant access to answers and beyond what is in our textbooks.  It is entertaining and interactive and we seem to be born knowing how to use it.

Jami:    We like using technology, plain and simple.  It allows us to go beyond what we thought was ever possible.

Alexis:  Personalized instruction sounds great on paper, but the reality of large classrooms and limited resources is what students are often faced with.

IMLS Digital Collections and Content

Anna:   When people talk education you often hear, “One size doesn’t fit all...”

Parker: Equality versus equity ...we all get the same or we get what we need.

Anna:   Exactly, like differentiated learning in the classroom.  Getting what you need to succeed.

IMLS Digital Collections and Content

Anna:   When people talk education you often hear, “One size doesn’t fit all...”

Parker: Equality versus equity ...we all get the same or we get what we need.

Anna:   Exactly, like differentiated learning in the classroom.  Getting what you need to succeed.

IMLS Digital Collections and Content

Anna:   When people talk education you often hear, “One size doesn’t fit all...”

Parker: Equality versus equity ...we all get the same or we get what we need.

Anna:   Exactly, like differentiated learning in the classroom.  Getting what you need to succeed.

Wikimedia Commons

Sydney:           I think that people don’t always understand what it means to communicate.  Or more so, what it means to communicate effectively. (music stops)

Brianna:           When we visited with Dr. Jessica Lutjohns, a behavioral therapist in Sioux City I got a clearer idea of what communication is and how to generate conversations in a more positive way.

German born in 1934, Inge Auerbacher was taken to Terezín (Theresienstadt) concentration camp in Czechoslovakia at the age of 7. Of 15,000 children imprisoned at the camp, about 1 percent survived. Miraculously, her parents, who had also been transported to Terezín, lived. Upon returning to the place that had been their home, the family discovered thirteen close relatives had been slaughtered by the Nazis. They soon immigrated to the United States.