The Exchange 09.22.21 The Other Talk; "Beautiful Country" & Redistricting

Sep 22, 2021

This week on The Exchange, an author has written a how-to book for parents in dealing with racism and white privilege. We talk with Brian Kiely.  We also talk with author of a New York Times' bestselling memoir about her childhood.  Qian Julie Wang and her family came to the United States from China, and found that life in America was not going be easy.  

And we have some good news about the cost of Marketplace health plans. and about the prospects for graduates of joint union-employer apprentice plans.  And a conversation with Julia Whelan, whose golden voice has probably narrated a book you love.

But first, we take a look at the progress of creating legislative redistricting in Iowa with University of Northern Iowa Associate Professor of Politicl Science Christopher Larimer. Larimer explains how the districts of Iowa will change, and what it means for all of us.

Christopher Larimer

It looks like people who need a better deal and some advice on Marketplace health insurance plans have somewhere to turn and, possibly, lower prices. We talk with Jeremy Smith of the non-profit Iowa Navigator, that helps people choose the right health care plan. And we talk about the benefits of joint union-employer apprenticd plans in Iowa, which seem to offer wages that rival the salaries of those with four-year degrees. We speak with Frank Manzo of the Midwest Economic Policty Institute.

Talking to kids about racism isn't easy, and many white kids have little knowledge about it or white privilege. Teacher and author Brian Kiely addresses this issue in his new book, "The Other Talk: Reckoning with Our White Privilege." I talked with him about his experiences and why he wrote the book.

Racism is also burden for many immigrants to the United States. Qian Julie Wang writes about her family's journey from China to Brooklyn in the 1990s, and how she came out the other side of poverty and pain in her book , "Beautiful Country." Wang says she wanted to tell her story and give readers an understanding of the trials of undocmented immigrants.  Wang became a citizen in 2016.

And today we hear from Julia Whelan, an actress who has narrated a large number of books, and you might have read some of them. She is known for her beautiful voice and impeccible delivery.