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Spring Flood Forecast Outlook "Grim" on Missouri River Below Sioux CIty

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The National Weather Service has released the first of its three spring flood forecasts.

David Pearson is a hydrologist with the National Weather Service in Omaha. He says the outlook is “grim” for western Iowans who live along the Missouri River below Sioux City. The soil in the Missouri River basin is saturated.

Pearson says for the second year in a row, the risk of major flooding along the Mississippi River on the eastern side of Iowa is high. A National Weather Service Hydrologist says there’s more snow is on the ground in Minnesota and Wisconsin than there was at this time last year. More flood projections will be released in late February and mid-March.

One of 57 evacuees from the virus zone in China who is being held in quarantine in Nebraska was being transported Friday to a special unit of an Omaha medical center to undergo testing after developing upper respiratory symptoms.

A news release Friday from Nebraska Medicine says the person's symptoms are “extremely mild” and that the testing is being done out of an abundance of caution. The patient will be taken to the University of Nebraska Medical Center campus' federally funded National Quarantine Unit to be tested for the coronavirus.

The unit is separate from any of the buildings on campus where patients receive care.

Federal prosecutors have charged a Rapid City businessman in what they say was a $71 million scheme to sell fake organic grain and seed which he used to fuel an extravagant lifestyle that included a yacht, a multi-million dollar home, and luxury cars.

The U.S. Attorney's Office filed an indictment for wire fraud and money laundering last week against Kent Duane Anderson, alleging that he used a network of South Dakota businesses to sell non-organic grain and seed products as organic.   

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