WWII

Cultural Continuum 1-17-20

Jan 17, 2020

The Kee Live Music Festival gets underway Friday in Cherokee, the University of Okoboji Winter Games cranks up Thursday, and there are two new exhibits at the Clay County Heritage Center. In the metro area, MLK Day is Monday and the NAACP is putting on a big event at The First Congregational Church. Find out more on our first Cultural Continuum of the year.

The Algona Nativity

Dec 23, 2019

The first one was twelve feet wide, still quite a production because Jesus, Mary, and the babe were mud-sculptured, then baked, then painstakingly painted. Back in Germany, Eduard Kaib had been an architect. That’s not to say his hand-made Nativity–all of twelve feet wide–required architectural expertise. It was Christmas, 1944, and Kaib was a long, long way from home. Things just got to him; so he decided to create this most famous barnyard scene, a fully manned–and animal-ed–nativity.

Keystone/Second Roberts Commission [Public domain] / Wikimedia Commons

It's 1944. Otto Steinke is too old to be drafted, his son just a few months too young. Besides, both are needed because the Allied cause requires mountains of food, food the Steinkes can produce on their Iowa farm. Not everyone can be a soldier, even some who really, really want to be. 

On The Exchange this week we talk with some of the candidates from this general election.  Mayor Bob Scott will talk about his re-election and Rhonda Capron says goodbye to the Sioux City Council after eight years of service.  SOHO restaurant and bar owner Julie Schoenherr bested Capron.  We will speak with Schoenherr as well.

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Corn growers and ethanol producers may get some good news soon, according to Iowa’s senior senator. 

Republican Chuck Grassley says President Donald Trump was surprised that his decision to exempt 31 refineries from their ethanol obligations generated a lot of opposition. Grassley and others met at the White House last week and presented a plan to correct the problem: waived gallons from small refineries need to be re-assigned to someone else. Grassley says the White House had its own proposal.

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Corn growers and ethanol producers may get some good news soon, according to Iowa’s senior senator. 

Republican Chuck Grassley says President Donald Trump was surprised that his decision to exempt 31 refineries from their ethanol obligations generated a lot of opposition. Grassley and others met at the White House last week and presented a plan to correct the problem: waived gallons from small refineries need to be re-assigned to someone else. Grassley says the White House had its own proposal.

Author Jim Schaap talks with Siouxland Public Media's Mark Munger about a Dutch resistance fighter in who defied the Nazies WWII. Diet Eman died last week.  Schaap worked with Eman on her biography. 

We talk with the president of Buena Vista University in Storm Lake, IA about a three million dollar gift that will help the school and the community work on rural economic projects and issues.

Also, a conversation about civility and modern life.

We talk with 4th district democratic candidate JD Scholten about his second try at winning the race against veteran

Cultural Continuum 9-07-18

Sep 7, 2018

The Sioux City International Film Festival gets underway Wednesday, but there are loads of things to do leading up to that. Live music, BBQ, hot rods, a planetarium show in Wayne and a chance to audition for the Northwest Iowa Symphony Orchestra.

Library of Congress's Prints and Photographs division

Those in the know were not particularly surprised to see Kaitlin Bennett come on campus around graduation dolled up as she was--her mortar board darlingly decorated with a dare, and her brother's assault rifle, with scope, slung over her shoulder. News stories claim that she was an outspoken 2nd Amendment advocate during her tenure as a student and that she wasn't at all shy about shooting off her mouth about guns.   

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