Tribe

Thomas M. Easterly

Had I gone to school in Iowa, perhaps, I’d have known a headman, a chief, named No Heart; after all, his people left their name behind when they travelled west and south. We're Iowans because of him--and them. They left their name behind, but little more we design to remember.

Nonetheless, you should know that No Heart’s descendants are a proud people who live in Oklahoma and have for years, despite their name. They call home just outside the town where my son's family lives, just across the Cimarron. 

You’re listening to The Exchange, on Siouxland Public Media.  I’m Mary Hartnett.  The language of the Omaha Tribe is in crisis.  There are fewer than a dozen native speakers left.  However, a Nebraska filmmaker has produced a new documentary called “The Omaha Speaking.”  Timmerman has been working in partnership with Omaha tribal elders and sisters Octa Keen, Winona Caramony, and Glenna Slater.   85 year old Glenna teaches at the Nebraska Indian Community College.  I spoke with Timmerman and Glenna this week when they were in Sioux City for an event.