Small Wonders

NPS

It's hard to estimate, given Covid, but it wouldn't be a risk to guess that, this summer, more than three million visitors to Yellowstone will stop by this park behemoth. It's not as great a favorite as Old Faithful, but the Glacial Boulder, Yellowstone calls it, sits in state like a great gray relic between the trees, as if, like Gulliver, it’s imprisoned by matchsticks. The Glacial Boulder is huge. It shall not be moved, nor has it since it got washed along--that's right, washed along--by an anonymous glacier, impossible as that is to imagine.

This week on The Exchange, a report on the aquittal in the nationally-watched story of Des Moines Register reporter Andrea Suhouri.  Sohouri was pepper sprayed and arrested this summer at a Black Lives Matter event in Des Moines.  She was accused of disobeying a police order.  The trial in Des Moines lasted three days. 

Jim Schaap of Small Wonders and Siouxland Public Media's General Manger Mark Munger bring stories of Christmas to lighten our load in these difficult days.

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This week on The Exchange, what citizens may have to do to move the US to a universal health care system.  Nearly every other wealthy, developed country in the world has already done so.   Rosemarie Day is the author of new book on the subject.  She helped run the Massachusetts version of the Affordable Care Act.  

 

On this edition of The Exchange, we talk with Tyler Brock of Siouxland District Health about the number of COVID-19 cases in Woodbury County and how to keep ourselves safe during the pandemic.

We also speak with Sioux City Community Schools Superintendent Paul Gausman about the outlook for students, who are currently out of school because of the coronavirus, to get back to class this school year.

This week on The Exchange, 

Presidential candidate and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg meets with potential caucus-goers in Siouxland.  We have a report.

Also, some of the Democratic candidates who are vying for an opportunity to oust US Senator Joni Ernst next year say they feel the impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump should go forward.

Coming up this week on The Exchange,

We hear from Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds who was in Siouxland yesterday to open a new fiber-optic network center downtown. She also met up with teachers and students in a Western Iowa Tech program that teaches students how to build homes.   It’s part of the Future Ready Iowa Initiative.

A report on the needs of the nurses at Mercy One, who are involved in a contract dispute with their employer.   

We talk with a Siouxland native who has created an app to help farmers monitor the health of their pigs.

This week on The Exchange, 

We talk with the five city council candidates that will compete in the primary election on October 8th.

Also, a discussion with comedian Lewis Black who performs this weekend at the Orpheum in Sioux City.

We get a preview of Friday’s GlowFest at Western Iowa Tech Community College.

And Jim Schaap who we hear often talking about Small Wonders will talk about the beauty and majesty of the Loess Hills, and give us a preview of a live event next week at the Broken Kettle Grasslands Reserve.

Cultural Continuum 11-02-18

Nov 2, 2018

Great weekend to get out if you're looking for some art, also the Siouxland Coffee Festival gets underway at the Sioux City Convention Center another fine performance for the Morningside College Piano Recital Series and Watermelon Slim and his band go to work at Vangarde Arts.

  The Exchange 080118. 

Coming up next on The Exchange, President Donald Trump has put tariffs on commodities like corn, soybeans and steel, to help even out America’s trade deficit with China.  However, Iowa farmers are already feeling the pain with lower prices and fears for the future.

Also, the sounds of the upcoming African Night.

And another Small Wonder with Jim Schaap.  That and more coming up on The Exchange, but first, this news.

Introduction

Welcome to the Exchange, on Siouxland Public Media, I’m Mary Hartnett. 

Remember Sacagawea

Apr 10, 2017

What happened to her when she was a kid wasn't all that unusual among nomadic, war-faring Great Plains tribes. When her people--the Shoshones--started into a bloody fight with another--the Hidatsas--she got herself kidnapped, lost her home, then got another she surely hadn’t asked for, and was eventually--sad but true--sold into slavery. At the time, she was only ten years old. 

James Schaap

The only means of getting man and woman, beast and wagon across the rain-swollen Niobrara was by rope, hand over hand. Dozens of oxen and as many as 500 horses had to get to the other side, as did 523 Ponca men, women, and children. 

And the rain wouldn't stop. All those wagons were disassembled and shouldered through and over the raging Niobrara. It took a day to recover, yet another rainy day.

They were all wooden-shoe clad. I’m told klompen are wonderful insulators and they had to be because that morning the temperature was --22, if you can believe the stories, which is risky.

Snow quilted everything, and there was no road, nothing really but experience to guide those sleighs all from Orange City west to Calliope, 23 miles in insufferable cold. It was January 22, 1872.

Jeanne Reynal

  

A January thaw is what all of us look forward to right now, a breath of warmth that reopens our hope that someday soon April will return. Two cold-of-winter days, maybe three, of forty degrees. No wind.

Heaven comes to Siouxland.

That’s the relief people felt early on January 12, 1888, when most of those who’d put down homesteads had just arrived.

Here’s how David Laskin describes that morning:

Something happened way back when, a crime long gone from the memories of anyone downtown Hawarden today. Probably never made the Sioux City Journal, but everyone in town, circa 1895, had to know because when the mighty fall the crash is as momentous as it is memorable.

This man was of high standing, among the pastor’s closest friends, a saintly man caught with his hands in the till, grabbing a fortune more than a few buffalo nickels. That good man’s fall affected a precocious little girl for the rest of her life, a child who became a novelist and never forgot.

Clear as a friend's heart, 'twas, and seeming cool--

A crystal bowl whence skyey deeps looked up.

So might a god set down his drinking cup

Charged with a distillation of haut skies.

As famished horses, thrusting to the eyes

Parched muzzles, take a long-south water-hole,

Hugh plunged his head into the brimming bowl

as though to share the joy with every sense. 

And lo, the tang of that wide insolence 

Of sky and plain was acrid in the draught!

How ripplingly the lying water laughed!

Religious visions were everywhere in the years preceding the Civil War. Boom towns out west here may have been hell holes for a time, but they were also peopled by starry-eyed believers who claimed their marching orders came from on high.

Tabor, Iowa, sits on a bluff far above the Missouri, the highest point of Fremont County. The place is not in terrific shape today; but Tabor has an epic past, created when fiery abolitionist Congregationalists set up camp here, just across the river from Nebraska.

A few scrappy, three-foot cuttings, no bigger than buggy whips, are coming up from the front yards of a half-dozen houses thought itself to be a town. That's it--the only trees for miles around. Mr. Taylor, a school board member who lived in the back of his own shop, sends his hired man around to take you to the Talbot's sod house, about a mile out of town. You don’t know the Talbot’s.

It's 1888, and you’d never been on a perfectly endless landscape like the one you’re on. It's hot, very hot, but there's a breeze--feel it?--the only thing keeping you from sweaty suffocation. 

You might have missed a Mormon monument not all that far from here, just down the road from Niobrara, Nebraska. It’s easy to pass by.

In the middle years of the 19th century, the Poncas were here, the Santees were here, even some Pawnees--and occasional Sioux bands never far away. That meant cavalry and agents and suppliers and draymen, not to mention swells of dreamers when anyone out west claimed to find gold in them thar’ hills. Simply said, there were more people coming and going.