Siouxland

We began planning this show last week, but, in these times, the amount of change from day-to-day is stunning, if not disorienting. Since then, we have seen school’s close; fitness centers, restaurants, bars, casinos are having to close or limit service; grocery stores are having difficulty keeping shelves stocked. It’s one of those moments when you feel the world is different from what you thought it was only days ago. One of our concerns is the disinformation surrounding COVID-19, and, hopefully, we can bring some balance back today with our table of experts.

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It a very hot and humid day in Siouxland and most of Iowa is under an excessive heat warning, where temperatures will reach in the 90s and heat index values could be as high as 110 degrees.

The National Weather Service says the heat warning is for the southern two-thirds of the state under Highway 20. 

Paul Fajman (FAY-min) is with the National Weather Service in Omaha, (which forecasts for southwest Iowa).   

Fajman (FAY-min) says Sunday may be the first day of relief. 

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Iowa U.S. Senators Chuck Grassley and Joni Ernst say flood control should be the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ number 1 priority in managing the Missouri River.

At a Senate field hearing in Glenwood today the corps of engineers defended it’s handling of this year’s historic flooding, saying,  last month’s weather was so extreme that flooding could not have been prevented.

Local and national leaders joined forces today to try and come up for solutions for homelessness and substance abuse in Siouxland.

Wikimedia Commons

Seems to me that houses these days have no attics, and I think that’s sad.

In what might be his most famous book, Curtis Harnack, born and reared just outside Remsen, spends an entire essay on the attics he explored as a kid in his ancient Iowa farm house, one complete chapter of his celebrated We Have All Gone Away. 

That wasn’t enough. A few years later he followed up with yet another memoir of the farm, The Attic, proving thereby that attics are actually treasure troves.

SD Chief Justice Mental Evaluations

South Dakota’s Supreme Court Chief Justice is urging lawmakers to ease regulations on who can perform mental health evaluations.  Siouxland Public Media’s Mary Hartnett has this report.

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James Schaap

The sign out front claims a well-kept church up on a hill north of Flandreau is "The Oldest Continuously Used Church in South Dakota" (all caps because it is, for sure, a title worth coveting). That means it's been "First Presbyterian" for 137 years, "River Bend Church" when it was established along the Big Sioux River long, long ago. The name change came later.

The Last Buffalo

Dec 26, 2016

"Now, boys, is our time for fun." That's what the hoity-toity artist said when he saw a herd of buffalo Comstock, the rancher, had spotted along the Republican River.
 

Albert Bierstadt was on his way back from California when he and the newspaper man traveling with him stopped at the Oak Grove Ranch and decided to try his hand--not at hunting buffalo but painting them. Comstock and his men armed themselves with rifles; Bierstadt packed brushes.

He wanted an angry bull, he said, "so mad that he'll bellow and tear up the ground," Bierstadt told Comstock.

Something happened way back when, a crime long gone from the memories of anyone downtown Hawarden today. Probably never made the Sioux City Journal, but everyone in town, circa 1895, had to know because when the mighty fall the crash is as momentous as it is memorable.

This man was of high standing, among the pastor’s closest friends, a saintly man caught with his hands in the till, grabbing a fortune more than a few buffalo nickels. That good man’s fall affected a precocious little girl for the rest of her life, a child who became a novelist and never forgot.

Clear as a friend's heart, 'twas, and seeming cool--

A crystal bowl whence skyey deeps looked up.

So might a god set down his drinking cup

Charged with a distillation of haut skies.

As famished horses, thrusting to the eyes

Parched muzzles, take a long-south water-hole,

Hugh plunged his head into the brimming bowl

as though to share the joy with every sense. 

And lo, the tang of that wide insolence 

Of sky and plain was acrid in the draught!

How ripplingly the lying water laughed!

Religious visions were everywhere in the years preceding the Civil War. Boom towns out west here may have been hell holes for a time, but they were also peopled by starry-eyed believers who claimed their marching orders came from on high.

Tabor, Iowa, sits on a bluff far above the Missouri, the highest point of Fremont County. The place is not in terrific shape today; but Tabor has an epic past, created when fiery abolitionist Congregationalists set up camp here, just across the river from Nebraska.

In 1875, the year before the Battle at Little Big Horn, a 30-year-old single woman named Mary C. Collins, who’d been living in eastern Iowa, accepted an appointment as a missionary/teacher on the Great Sioux Reservation of the Dakota territories.

The Akimbo Cross

Nov 21, 2016
James Schaap

The day lilies planted around the little frame church are mostly a weed patch. The dried-up front door begs paint, the cross at the peak just above it is bent slightly in fashion that’s sad for a cross, akimbo. An electrical cord from somewhere inside dangles over the peak, suggesting that if you want juice inside you set up a generator on the badly-pitched front step.

Seems downright amazing today, but in the years just following the Civil War, two activist groups determined to get women the right to vote, went toe-to-toe for reasons that, in retrospect, seem as lightweight as their skirmishing. The National Women’s Suffrage Association (NWSA) actually opposed the passing of the 15th amendment to the U. S. Constitution (prohibiting states from denying male citizens the right to vote, thus admitting African-American men). The NWSA was not the least bit racist.

Not Even The Past

Oct 9, 2016

Not everyone believes the Homestead Act of 1862 worth celebrating. If I were Native American, I wouldn’t be thrilled to know the government gave away land they considered vacant.

Lighting candles for the Homestead Act is like making Columbus Day a holiday: isn't it wonderful that Columbus "discovered" the Americas?”—as if nothing was here before the Nina, Pinta, and the Sante Maria beached.

Welcome. Sit. Stay. Silky.

Sep 30, 2016

Silky the cat joins us on Welcome. Sit. Stay. He has brothers and sisters needing a home all waiting together at the Siouxland Humane Society. Go get 'em.

Support for Welcome. Sit. Stay. comes from Priscilla E Forsyth, Attorney at Law, located in Sioux City and providing criminal defense and immigration law services to the Siouxland community.

Ode: Ryan Allen "Living on the Edge"

May 25, 2016

LIVING ON THE EDGE

   I’ve lived in many places in my life.   I’ve wandered, I’ve been lost. I’ve searched for things and people I didn’t even know I was looking for.

   I spy through a camera. The world is mad. I try but can’t find any sense. I turn the lens inward and I get even more confused. Where am I supposed to go? How am I supposed to be? I can’t seem to find my place. I’m in-between worlds: between clarity and madness, between being a father and being a son, between a prairie of wild grass and a forest of planted trees.

Leadership Siouxland

Leadership Siouxland prepares leaders for all the facets of our community, whether its the ambitious entrepreneur or the  retired community organizer. And, to the benefit of Siouxland, they have been on this mission for 30 years. Executive director Amanda Beller joined Steve Smith to talk about how you can get involved with leadership Siouxland, as well as how you can help celebrate their 30th anniversary.   

Buddy's previous owners fell upon financial difficulties, so now this little fellow must find a new home. He will need some exercise, so he would be a great motivator for getting out as the nice weather comes in. You can find Buddy at the Siouxland Humane Society.

This weeks poem is from Gretchen Gondek:

We had a pug
     we called her puggy.  
She slept all day
     and left puggy doodles 
          in the basement at night.

Chef Brett McCarthy, the top chef of WITCC's Culinary Arts program joins Gretchen today. They discuss the upcoming party that Siouxland Public Media and the Siouxland Film Festival will be throwing next week, which features not only the premier of the festival's documentary nigh, but also gourmet food prepared by the culinary institute's chefs and students. 

SPM’s Gretchen Gondek speaks with volunteers Dr. Mary Day and Bobbi Segura from Iowa Women Lead Change about the 2nd annual IWLC conference taking place on Tuesday, February 16, at the Marina Inn.  IWLC is a non-profit organization striving to educate, inspire, and challenge women to be the leaders of today and tomorrow. 

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Siouxland

Gretchen speaks with Rocky Welker (E.D. at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Siouxland) about the annual Chili & Salsa Cook Off, September 19th at the Hard Rock Hotel. 

Rocky (who does a mean cha-cha-cha) will talk up the festival which expands this year to include a kid’s zone, live music, and, of course, great chili and salsa!

Thunder, a poodle that looks like a beautiful dark cloud, joins us on Welcome. Sit. Stay. He has a wonderful disposition and is not loud, as his name suggests. In fact, he floated right up to us and quietly settled onto our laps. You can find him at the Siouxland Humane Society

Support for Welcome. Sit. Stay. comes from Priscilla E. Forsyth, Attorney at Law, located in Sioux City and providing criminal defense and immigration law services to the Siouxland community. 

25 Years of the ADA

Jul 23, 2015
Tom Olin

"The Civil Rights Act of 1964 didn't include people with disabilities, and people didn't realize that. So what [the Americans with Disabilities Act] did is put in place specific parameters for what you could and could not do for employment and accommodations, and what type of barriers are or are not acceptable," described Don Dew, executive director for Disabilities Resource Center of Siouxland.

Boozer, our little shih tzu, is the guest this week. He is just 4-months old and about that big. This little fellow is missing a bone in his ear, which makes him a little off-balanced, but no less desirable and maybe even more lovable, if possible. You can find him at the Siouxland Humane Society

Dusty is our guest on Welcome. Sit. Stay. He is a calm gentleman who would like a calm household without other doggies. You can find him at the Siouxland Humane Society.

 

Support for Welcome. Sit. Stay. comes from Priscilla E. Forsyth, Attorney at Law, located in Sioux City and providing criminal defense and immigration law services to the Siouxland community.

Susan Fey, editor of Siouxland Magazine, dropped by to talk to FM90's Steve Smith about the application process for the magazine's "10 under 40" issue.  

Hank Zimmerman, Elizabeth Munger

As ever, we are pleased to say that support for Welcome. Sit. Stay. comes from Priscilla E. Forsyth, Attorney at Law, located in Sioux City and providing criminal defense and immigration law services to the Siouxland community.

The Lit of Siouxland

Mar 16, 2015
orangecityarts.net

In talking with Dr. James Schaap about the books to be read in Siouxland 101, we cannot help but land upon the hardships of old times: grasshopper infestations, prairie fires, the unrelenting hand of nature. Walls of devastation that fell upon the early European settlers of Siouxland, that left families prostrated on the hard ground as their livelihood was lost, do not now, however, register in our list of daily fears.

kenieroses.deviantart.com

  

Gretchen Gondek speaks with Tracy Bennett about the Siouxland Civic Dance Association’s “Spring Festival,” taking place Sunday, March 8, at 2 p.m.  The performance will be held at the Klinger-Neal Theatre on the campus of Morningside College.

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