Religion

Legendary U.S. Congressman Berkley Bedell died over the weekend.  The Spirit Lake native served 12 years in DC. We hear about Bedell’s life and work from a former state lawmaker and Sioux City attorney Al Sturgeon.  He worked with Bedell more than 40 years ago.

It looks like Woodbury County voters will be asked to weigh in on a possible new law enforcement center in March of 202o, and we talk with Woodbury County Sheriff Dave Drew about the issues involved.

Jan Polack [Public domain] / Wikimedia Commons

To the Lakota people, they were the "black robes," those insanely-overdressed white men who, in flat, black hats, moved in as if out of nowhere to bring the basics of the white man's religion.

The Benedictines among them were led by Father Martin Marty, who would become the Vicar Apostolic of Dakota Territory and eventually Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of St. Paul. The Benedictines wore black robes long before they came to America; in fact, they identified themselves thereby and wore those monster cloaks, well, religiously.

Mostly.

Mary Hartnett

The Catholic Diocese of Sioux City released a list of priests who were credibly accused of sexual abuse of minors. Some victims claim that it may be too little, too late.  

This old Native story, at its start anyway, is all about beauty, and its attraction, about a woman, an Arikara woman, or so the legend says, a young woman so beautiful she attracted breathless warriors from all around, each of them bargaining with gifts—fine horses and other beautiful presents, whatever they could give--in return for this young woman’s hand.

Sounds like Shakespeare, doesn’t it?—a comely young maiden with too many suitors, all of whom will do absolutely anything to cut a deal she rejects, time after time after time.

Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

People I know have tipi rings on their South Dakota ranch, circles of stones visible only in summer, and then, only when cattle keep the grass down. But they're there, broad circles of half-submerged stones that mark the spots where, years ago our indigenous ancestors pitched tents, footprints of a different time.

Cultural Continuum 4-06-18

Apr 6, 2018
Visit Sioux City

Ode plays at the Marquee with opening act Edem Soul Music, there's art at the Benson Building and we blast off into a month of One Book One Siouxland with Margot Lee Shetterly's, Hidden Figures.

The Exchange May 10, 2017

May 11, 2017

The Exchange 051017

Coming up on The Exchange, we take a look at the meaning and possible effects of the executive order signed by President Trump last week that calls for a weakening of a law that bars churches and tax-exempt groups from endorsing political candidates.  The law is called the Johnson Amendment. 

Trump announcement

:18

“I will get rid of and totally destroy the Johnson Amendment and allow our representatives of faith to speak freely and without fear of retribution, I will do that, remember . . . . “

Sometimes, I feel like books find me, rather than the other way around.  This was the case with the book I am recommending today: Accidental Saints: Finding God in All the Wrong People by Nadia Bolz-Weber.   

Religious visions were everywhere in the years preceding the Civil War. Boom towns out west here may have been hell holes for a time, but they were also peopled by starry-eyed believers who claimed their marching orders came from on high.

Tabor, Iowa, sits on a bluff far above the Missouri, the highest point of Fremont County. The place is not in terrific shape today; but Tabor has an epic past, created when fiery abolitionist Congregationalists set up camp here, just across the river from Nebraska.

Listening for Grace by Ted Swartz

In Ted Swartz's Listening for Grace, the cello is the voice of a son who has told his father that he is gay. This reflects the Christian tradition in which the voice of the person giving rise to a conversation is not taking part in the conversation. It is also redolent of the ineffable pain experienced by many who are faced with the loss of their community because of their sexuality or the sexuality of a loved one.