NASA

Siouxland Public Media

A district court judge has rejected a request by former Gov. Terry Branstad’s lawyers to set aside a jury verdict that concluded Branstad discriminated against a former state official because he’s gay.

The ruling  rejects dozens of arguments, including challenges to legal rulings during trial and jury instructions.

Branstad’s attorneys asked the judge to set aside the July 15 jury verdict of $1.5 million awarded to former Iowa Workers’ Compensation Commissioner Chris Godfrey.

Today on The Exchange we commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first man on the moon, on July 20th, 1969.  We talk with Dr. Todd Young, Professor of Physics and Astronomy and the director of the Fred G. Dale Planetarium at Wayne State College about the importance of the moon landing, and why the space program is so important to our future. 

We also talk with some older Siouxlanders who recall watching the moon landing live on television all those years ago.  And we reminisce with Mary Hartnett and local historian Russ Gifford about their memories of the moon landing.

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A trial has begun in Polk County challenging Iowa’s voter ID law.

lawyers for a Latino civil rights group and a college student say the law unconstitutionally infringes upon Iowans exercising their right to vote. 

Attorney Bruce Spiva (spy-vuh) says these provisions put burdens on the right to vote that outweigh any potential benefits. 

Does E.T. Exist?

Oct 12, 2017

During breaks while working on the construction of the first atomic bomb in 1943, Enrico Fermi and his colleagues talked of many things.  One of which was alien intelligence. 

The Milky Way galaxy that we live in is easily large enough to house millions of civilizations and is certainly old enough (about 13.5 billion years old) so that one of them should have colonized the galaxy by now, so Enrico asked, “Where are they?”  This questions is now known as the Fermi Paradox. 

Don Davis

Let’s talk about the possibilities of collisions with the Earth.

Actually, our Earth is being hit all the time by cosmic dust and meteors. More often than not, these will fall into the atmosphere and burn up, producing a streak of light in the sky we call a “shooting star.”  But sometimes the chunks are big enough so that part of the original chunk gets through the atmosphere.  Anywhere between 5 – 300 metric tons of dust and meteors strike the Earth per day!

Kids Scoop: Chandra's X-Ray Universe

Apr 19, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

This past month, two Kid Scoop News feature reporters, Brianna Martinez and Sydney Hopkins, interviewed author Wallace H.