Love

This is Barb Gross with the Sioux City Public Library, and you’re listening to “Check it Out.” As a new year’s resolution – which now seems like a lifetime ago – a friend and I began a quest to read two books each month written by African American authors. By reading more diversely, we hope to increase our empathy for the experiences of black people in America. Little did we know how important this reading would be now. 

This is Kelsey Patterson with the Sioux City Public Library and you’re listening to Check It Out. Today, I’m back to recommend another contemporary romance, The Right Swipe by Alisha Rai. This sizzling new novel tackles all the hilarity, pitfalls, successes, and vulnerability required in modern dating. 

Rhiannon Hunter may have revolutionized romance in the digital world with the creation of her dating app Crush, but in real life she only swipes right on her career—and the occasional hookup. The cynical CEO controls her love life with a few key rules:

Check It Out: This Tender Land by William Kent Krueger

May 11, 2020

        This is Jennifer Havlik, with the Sioux City Public Library, and you’re listening to Check It Out. 

Today I’m recommending This Tender Land by William Kent Krueger. This novel takes place during the Great Depression, and while it is a work of historical fiction, the author’s extensive research and vivid description creates authenticity in events and setting. 

This is Kelsey Patterson with the Sioux City Public Library and you’re listening to Check It Out. Today, I’m recommending Beth O’Leary’s debut novel, The Flatshare.

Derek Redmond and Paul Campbell / Wikimedia Commons

Imagine what it would have been like to wake up Monday morning to the strains of Jimi Hendrix playing the “Star-Spangled Banner”? Well, that's how Woodstock came to a close after 3 days of peace and love.

On this hour of the B-Sides with Bolin and Blumberg, you get to hear the whole thing plus the remarkable performance of Joe Cocker doing the Beatles' “With a Little Help from my Friends” and The Jefferson Airplane waking up the crowd on Sunday morning with “Volunteers.”

Mark Goff / Wikimedia Commons

This week marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most beloved cultural events of the 20th century.  Woodstock marked the way people could celebrate, en masse, in a peaceful and joyful time together on this planet.

And the B-Sides is here to help you celebrate the universal karma that was three and a half days of peace and love.

Johnnie and I believe the event was so significant that we have dedicated two shows to Woodstock, its music and history.

“Consequences of the Raid,” written by Cecilia Salazar, is a story that takes place on a dairy farm in Northwest Iowa. It conveys the experiences of the farm’s hardworking immigrant employees like Claudia, her husband, Armando, and their family members and friends. It especially focuses on the horrifying day that the Immigration officer came to the farm to arrest and deport Felipe.

The story is true and is based on a raid that took place in Northwest Iowa in the winter of 2008. The names of the people it depicts have been changed. What follows is an adapted excerpt.

“Consequences of the Raid,” written by Cecilia Salazar, is a story that takes place on a dairy farm in Northwest Iowa. It conveys the experiences of the farm’s hardworking immigrant employees like Claudia, her husband, Armando, and their family members and friends. It especially focuses on the horrifying day that the Immigration officer came to the farm to arrest and deport Felipe.

The story is true and is based on a raid that took place in Northwest Iowa in the winter of 2008. The names of the people it depicts have been changed. What follows is an adapted excerpt.

I have to admit that I don’t often read romance novels.  Maybe this is because the one thing that all romances have in common is that there is always a happy ending, and maybe I’m too much of a skeptic.  But today, I am recommending Katherine Center’s latest novel, How to Walk Away—a book that shows us that there are all kinds of happy endings. 

This is Jenn Delperdang with the Sioux City Public Library, and you’re listening to Check It Out.

Sweethearts on the Prairie

May 1, 2017

In the barest of outlines, their getting together seems a marriage of convenience. If you stop at the Homestead Monument, you might just think the gravestone up on the hill marks something cold. Pioneers like Daniel Freeman were incapable of expressing their feelings, if they have feelings at all. Isn’t that right?

Besides, old Daniel had to be flat out lonely. The Civil War was finally over and he’s got a place of his own, a homestead, first one anywhere. What he needs is woman.

When Sven Johnson, his wife and two children, left their native Norway, they spent the next eight weeks crossing the choleric Atlantic in a sailboat. Impossible to imagine.

A brother lived here in this new land, 100 miles from a place called Omaha, where that brother promised to meet Sven and his family, and did, although a couple days later than he'd said. If the Johnsons worried for a couple of homeless days, Sven doesn't mention it in his pioneer memoir.

What the sad young man saw was a path up the hill. He had no idea where it went. It seemed to go nowhere at all, but he’d been all over the country looking for his love.

A thousand stories and as many legends begin at the foot of a path that has no visible end, but not this story. This story ends with a lonely road that leads to a deadly somewhere. And it’s set here, not that far away, at the foot of a path now long gone, a path from the banks of the Missouri to the top of Blackbird Hill, a path that exists only in some folks’ imagination.

Wikimedia Commons

Lament, rage, bombast, it's all there in Sir William Walton's First Symphony. Written on the bones of a failed relationship, the first three movements describe a bitter time, one that can only be brought to existence by a powerful love. The final movement, composed after the mess and in the swell of a new love, recalls that instigating feeling. It is performed, here, by the London Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Andre Previn.