James

Sioux City Journal

Jim Goff walked into the Sioux City Museum & Historical Association to research his family history and ended up finding a passion for processing artifacts. Jim now spends over 550 hours volunteering annually.  To find out how to make a difference in your community, jump to https://www.volunteersiouxland.org.

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We’ve taken that razor-straight county road east and west often enough to have stopped, but never did. Last week, with time to kill, I pulled off where a bleached sign announced a historical marker with the headline Fort Brule.

A few scrappy, three-foot cuttings, no bigger than buggy whips, are coming up from the front yards of a half-dozen houses thought itself to be a town. That's it--the only trees for miles around. Mr. Taylor, a school board member who lived in the back of his own shop, sends his hired man around to take you to the Talbot's sod house, about a mile out of town. You don’t know the Talbot’s.

It's 1888, and you’d never been on a perfectly endless landscape like the one you’re on. It's hot, very hot, but there's a breeze--feel it?--the only thing keeping you from sweaty suffocation. 

Seems downright amazing today, but in the years just following the Civil War, two activist groups determined to get women the right to vote, went toe-to-toe for reasons that, in retrospect, seem as lightweight as their skirmishing. The National Women’s Suffrage Association (NWSA) actually opposed the passing of the 15th amendment to the U. S. Constitution (prohibiting states from denying male citizens the right to vote, thus admitting African-American men). The NWSA was not the least bit racist.

Things We Couldn't Say

Jun 21, 2016

Following Holland's fall to Hitler's army, Diet Eman's Jewish friend Herman was told to report for transport. Upon hearing this, she and her fiance, Hein Sietsma, made the decision to risk their lives for their beliefs. Diet and Hein would later be sent to concentration camps for their acts of resistance, and Hein would indeed lose his life. Diet survived. She came to the United States and made her home in Michigan following the war, and she began to tell her story. The author James Schaap happened to be one of her listeners, and, taken by her story, offered to be her biographer.

That Saturday morning what me and my camera wanted to get was a couple of fine shots of gravestones adorned in the long, early morning shadows. I headed out to the Doon cemetery, where the stones hug a rolling hill above the Rock River, a setting that offers a cemetery more wordless gravitas than graveyards ordinarily have.

Today, I’m recommending a captivating story of love-gone-wrong titled Lies You Wanted to Hear by James Whitfield Thomson. With this first novel, Thomson proves that he is an author-to-watch with this page-turning, beautifully written story, of how over the years, the smallest crack in a relationship, can slowly become a canyon too wide to cross.

The 2015 Morningside Piano Recital Series opens with a performance by Yekwon Sunwoo, a young pianist who is lighting the world on fire. He has been winning major international piano competitions for the past few years, including the Vendome Prize at the Verbier Festival, and the top prize at the 2012 William Kapell International Piano competition. 

Iowa Piano Competition

Mar 19, 2015
iowapianocompetition.org

This year marks the 8th Iowa Piano Competition, a tremendous event that draws top pianists from around the world -- past winners include Wayne WengChaoyin Cai, and Denis Evstuhin, an elite group of artists, to say the least.

The Lit of Siouxland

Mar 16, 2015
orangecityarts.net

In talking with Dr. James Schaap about the books to be read in Siouxland 101, we cannot help but land upon the hardships of old times: grasshopper infestations, prairie fires, the unrelenting hand of nature. Walls of devastation that fell upon the early European settlers of Siouxland, that left families prostrated on the hard ground as their livelihood was lost, do not now, however, register in our list of daily fears.

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