B Sides

Asylum Records [Public domain] / Wikimedia Commons

This week we go back in time to a remarkable decade in rock history as we explore the organic and prolific explosion of California folk-rock artists we still treasure today. 

As folk artists gradually moved from Greenwich Village to West Hollywood, singer songwriters such as Crosby, Stills, and Nash, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne, Joni Mitchell, James Taylor, Carole King and Linda Ronstadt emerged from the living rooms of Laurel Canyon to become hit makers of the record industry.        

As American as apple pie, the blues have carved an important niche in this nation's musical history. On this episode of the B-Sides with Bolin and Blumberg, we take a look at some of the more recent additions to this legacy.

Joined by Steve Smith, host of Siouxland Public Media's Ten O'clock Blues, we take a trip from coast to coast to coast to bring you some of the more prolific artists tied to this genre.

Have you ever wondered what happened to your favorite artists? On this B-Sides with Bolin and Blumberg, we take a listen to four bands which were very popular during their times, but which have since faded a bit over the years.

Collective Soul is one of those groups that garnered much attention back when they first hit the scene in 1990. Although still together, the band was really a hit with their first two albums. We showcase two of their hits which drew critical and commercial success when first released.

MTV / Wikimedia Commons

On this episode of the B-Sides with Bolin and Blumberg, we take a deep dive into blues and rock from the great state of Texas. The music comes from Dallas, Fort Worth, Austin, San Antonio and Houston. And while you've likely heard most of the artists, it's always nice to hear from everybody in one hour.

We start with one of the most popular bands from the Lone Star State -- Asleep at the Wheel. They put their spin on an old Eric Clapton song, Lay Down Sally.

Tony Morelli / Wikimedia Commons

The year was 1969, the year of Woodstock. It was there that America's first supergroup took the stage for one of its first performances.

Crosby, Stills and Nash were about to begin a musical journey, which still resonates today. Neil Young joined the group slightly thereafter to play on the band's second album, Deja Vu.

Nonetheless, it is illustrative of not only the group's output, but of where they came from and how those bands contributed to the bedrock of American rock and roll.

First it started with The Beatles (who else?), then came Badfinger and The Raspberries, and then Cheap Trick and Big Star. They all had super melodies and hooks to keep you humming all day.

But for some reason the crunchy, jangly guitars and the driving backbeat never really came into its own. For some reason, radio never picked up on power pop leaving it to be found by a small cult of music nerds, who dug the harmonies and everything else about it.