America

Pinkerton's Detective Agency / Wikimedia Commons

For the record, the Rock Island Express the boys hit that night was eight cars long--four coaches, two sleepers, and two baggage and express cars. It left Council Bluffs at five, on a run to Chicago. Oddly enough, the last sleeper was full of Chinese students on their way to colleges out east. The date was July 21, 1873.

Dreamers

Jul 22, 2019
Antonio Saltini / History of Agricultural Sciences , Vol. II p. 673. The sun 24 hours Edagricole, Bologna 1987. ISBN: 8820624133

It’s gone now, but the recent Somalia exhibit at St. Paul's Minnesota History Center featured a Somali plow, a wooden contraption, the ox-drawn ancestor of, well, what we might see out here in Siouxland, some huge 21-bottom plow pulled along a Big Bud behemoth, 900 horsepower.

Imagine coming from a Somalian mud hut to the agri-world we live in. That massive tractor could open up more prairie in an hour than you could hope to see in a decade behind a sweaty team of oxen and that old wooden one-share doohickey.

Welcome to America.

PX Here

“Maria” is a story based on the true experiences of a young Mexican mother living in Northwest Iowa. It describes the hardships that forced Maria to leave her family, and the daily struggles she endures. Julie Blythe, the story’s author, frames Maria’s own journal entries within a stirring and heart-wrenching narrative. We present adapted excerpts of Maria’s journal entries.

………..

This old Native story, at its start anyway, is all about beauty, and its attraction, about a woman, an Arikara woman, or so the legend says, a young woman so beautiful she attracted breathless warriors from all around, each of them bargaining with gifts—fine horses and other beautiful presents, whatever they could give--in return for this young woman’s hand.

Sounds like Shakespeare, doesn’t it?—a comely young maiden with too many suitors, all of whom will do absolutely anything to cut a deal she rejects, time after time after time.

State Historical Society of North Dakota

Teddy Roosevelt’s ego is legendary, his ambition quite amply illustrated by his unsuccessful run for a third Presidential term, backed as he was by a political organization with the goofiest name in American political history, the Bull Moose Party.

Today, I’m recommending Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century by award-winning journalist Jessica Bruder. This compelling, eye-opening tale describes the author’s experience immersing herself into the “workamper” community, a contemporary nomadic population largely made up of transient older Americans living on the road.

Wikimedia Commons

Some may believe that standing, hand over heart, for "The Star-Spangled Banner" is a profoundly patriotic gesture, but as a measure of homage to homeland it out-and-out pales in comparison to the giddy excesses America--and the world--took when going off to war a hundred years ago. 

Wikimedia Commons

Some may believe that standing, hand over heart, for "The Star-Spangled Banner" is a profoundly patriotic gesture, but as a measure of homage to homeland it out-and-out pales in comparison to the giddy excesses America--and the world--took when going off to war a hundred years ago. 

Lamb Theatre

Inspiration can strike from anywhere. Reading the obits one day, Kenneth Jones came across the story of Emily Wheelock Reed, a librarian who lived and worked in Alabama during the 1950's and 60's. Trouble began for her when she added illustrator Garth Williams' book The Rabbits' Wedding to her stacks, a book that portrays the marriage of a black rabbit and a white rabbit.

Check It Out: Destiny of the Republic

Sep 27, 2016

The Sioux City Public Library's Jessi Wakefield recommends Destiny of the Republic.

--

Support for Check It Out comes from Avery Brothers.  

Pages