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SPM News: English

Newscast 05.06.22: ISU political science professor says Iowa has a fair chance of retaining first-in-the-nation Presidential caucuses

ISU Political Science Professor Steffen Schmidt
iastate.edu
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iastate.edu
Iowa State University Political Science Professor Steffen Schmidt

The Iowa Democratic Party continues to press its case to begin the presidential primary season. The state party has submitted a letter to the D-N-C asking for the Iowa caucuses to remain first-in-the-nation. The D-N-C has opened up the presidential nominating calendar and is asking states to make their case. The D-N-C says it wants to favor more competitive and diverse states.

Professor of Political Science at Iowa State University Steffen Schmidt =ays he understands the Democratic Party’s concern over diversity, but he says there may be some misconceptions about the party’s makeup in Iowa.

“Iowa has a lot of Hispanics, a lot of African Americans, a lot of Asian Americans, and so the caucuses themselves, in the Democratic Party, not in the Republican, are pretty diverse,

Schmidt adds that the party has benefited greatly from the publicity landslide that is the Iowa Presidential caucuses.

“And you don’t want to eliminate a great event that gets a lot of publicity, and a lot of attention when you’re claiming that Iowa is too white.”

Schmidt says the failure of the Iowa caucus app two years ago resulted in Iowa being unfairly blamed for technology that was pushed on them by the DNC.

“And the app itself was very complicated and it didn’t work very well, and when it worked finally, most of the people at the caucuses, who chaired caucuses, hadn’t been trained, they didn’t know how to make it work. And so it was a really disgraceful failure of the national Democratic Party, not the Iowa Party.”

The state party will officially make their case to the DNC next month. Meanwhile, The Iowa Republican Party has kept things status quo and potential candidates have already begun testing the waters here in recent months.

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