Siouxland Public Media Interviews and Features

Weekday mornings at 7:50
  • Hosted by Mary Hartnett, Sheila Brummer, Steve Smith, and Mark Munger

We talk with the people in our community who are making art, news, music, and more. 

Dave Bernstein

Saturday in the Park co-founder Dave Bernstein talks to Siouxland Public Media’s Sheila Brummer about the annual event at Grandview Park in Sioux City.  Bernstein reflects on the past, pandemic postponement and producing Siouxland’s biggest summer event.  

This is Kelsey Patterson with the Sioux City Public Library and you’re listening to Check It Out.

This is Kelsey Patterson with the Sioux City Public Library and you’re listening to Check It Out. Today, I’m recommending The Farmer’s Son: Calving Season on a Family Farm by John Connell. A #1 Irish bestseller, this poignant memoir is perfect for fans of James Herriot, Ted Genoways, or really any reader interested in farming and rural life.

Farming has been in John Connell’s family for generations, but he never intended to follow in his father’s footsteps. Until, one winter, after more than a decade away, he finds himself back on the farm. 

Are you craving ‘feel-good’ stories? Do you want characters to cheer for?  Leave the bleak headlines behind as Kelsey and Jenn shine a light on likeable characters in fiction in this episode of The First Fifty Pages.

The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George

Evvie Drake Starts Over by Linda Holmes

Lost Lake by Sarah Addison Allen

The Story of Arthur Truluv by Elizabeth Berg

Isabel Dalhousie mysteries by Alexander McCall Smith

One Day by David Nicholls

Kristian Day

Siouxland Public Media prides itself on the music shows you can listen to at night.  They include World Café, American Routes and All Songs Considered.  But, there are locally-produced programs too; like Ten O’Clock Blues, Mix-Tape Dance Party, Moonwalk Radio, Saturday Night Jazz and South of the Border. 

In January of last year, Siouxland Public Media starting airing “Iowa Basement Tapes” Friday nights at 11 p.m.

  

  This is Kelsey Patterson with the Sioux City Public Library and you’re listening to Check It Out. 

Today, I’m recommending The Water Keeper, the latest novel from New York Times bestselling author Charles Martin. Continuing on his success from Send Down the Rain and The Mountain Between Us, The Water Keeper is Martin’s first story in a new series.

This is Jessi Wakefield with the Sioux City Public Library and you are listening to Check It Out.

Today I would like to recommend the works of modern thriller author, Riley Sager.

This Jessi Wakefield with the Sioux City Public Library and you’re listening to Check It Out.

I want to be up front about this title. This recommendation is on a romance novel. A romance novel that is very steamy at times. So, it’s not for everybody, but it’s not the steam that makes me want to recommend it, it’s the lovely characters and their individual journeys. 

Today I would like to share the little romantic gem, Get a Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert.

This is Jessi Wakefield with the Sioux City Public Library and you’re listening to Check It Out.

Today I would like to take a moment to suggest the creepy and unsettling page turner, The Chestnut Man by the internationally acclaimed Danish screenwriter turned novelist Soren Sveistrup.

The state of Iowa will open up significantly this Friday. Governor Kim Reynolds made that announcement this morning at her coronavirus news conference.  The opening includes most businesses excepting bars and casinos.

However, social distancing, and wearing a mask if your are not six feet away from others will be required.  Anyone who has been in close contact for more than 30 minutes with a confirmed positive case, also needs to continue to self-isolate for 14 days. 

All coronavirus-related restrictions will be lifted statewide this Friday, May 15. Governor Kim Reynolds made that announcement this morning at her coronavirus news conference. 

“All restrictions currently lifted in Iowa’s 77 counties will be expanded statewide, which includes restaurants, fitness centers, and additionally, salons, barber shops, massage therapy may reopen statewide, with some capacity restrictions, health measures that are put in place.”

Bars and casinos will not be allowed to reopen at this time.

Woodbury County COVID-19 casualties reached a new high yesterday with four deaths attributed to the disease.  Siouxland District Health reported the deaths along with 314 new positive cases of COVID-19.  Also, yesterday Iowa had the second-highest single day increase in Covid-19 deaths since the pandemic hit the state. The Iowa Department of Public Health reported eighteen more deaths and 539 additional cases of the coronavirus.  

Check It Out: This Tender Land by William Kent Krueger

May 11, 2020

        This is Jennifer Havlik, with the Sioux City Public Library, and you’re listening to Check It Out. 

Today I’m recommending This Tender Land by William Kent Krueger. This novel takes place during the Great Depression, and while it is a work of historical fiction, the author’s extensive research and vivid description creates authenticity in events and setting. 

Reading for enjoyment can be difficult when you're feeling anxious.  In this episode, Kelsey and Jenn discuss their go-to 'comfort' reads.  They also share ideas for reading when you're feeling anxious and favorite literary escapes for your #stayathome. 

This is Jessi Wakefield with the Sioux City Public Library and you’re listening to Check It Out.  And today I would like to talk to you about the sweet, subtle, supernatural love story, How to Stop Time by Matt Haig.     

Tom Hazard has a few rules that he lives by, but none more important than: Don’t fall in love. You see, he may look like an ordinary 41-year-old but he’s actually centuries old. He’s one of very few humans throughout time with a rare condition that makes him age much slower than a typical man.

Michael with his parents at his "White Coat Ceremony" in Iowa City -2017
Michael Klemme

Finding a doctor can be difficult in normal circumstances, but it can be even more tricky with isolation and limited access and opportunity.  

A University of Iowa clinic that serves low income people and immigrant communities is now offering telehealth services throughout the state of Iowa, including Siouxland.

Looking for something good to read? On this episode of The First Fifty Pages, Kelsey and Jenn share some of their favorite nonfiction books, as reviewed by Sioux City Public Library staff in clips from the Check It Out series.  Your To-Be-Read list is about to get longer... 

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A Sioux City homeless shelter closed early for the season, today (Wednesday) because of COVID-19.

Lindsay Landrum (LAN-drum) is the executive director of the Warming Shelter in Sioux City. She says the shelter doesn’t have the ability to quarantine people or staff if they become exposed to the new coronavirus. She told the residents this morning (yesterday/Wednesday morning) that they needed to leave.

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Monona County has its first case of the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19.

This is the fourth such case in Northwest Iowa.  Woodbury County was the first in the region to have a positive case announced over the weekend, followed by Sioux Countynthe following day. A second case was confirmed in Woodbury County this week. 

Today, the state of Iowa increased the number of COVID-19 cases to 124. That is 19 more than yesterday.  There were no new confirmed cases in Siouxland.

Sarah Reisetter from the Iowa Department of Public Health says currently “sheltering in place” in Iowa isn’t necessary for the time being.

Reisetter says people should stay home as much as possible, especially if you are over the age of 60; use social distancing, work from home if possible, stay away from large gatherings and use good personal hygiene.

Today, the state of Iowa increased the number of COVID-19 cases to 124, that’s 19 more than yesterday.  There were no new confirmed cases in Siouxland.

Sarah Reisetter from the Iowa Department of Public Health says currently “sheltering in place” in Iowa isn’t necessary for the time being.

“Shelter in place for two or three weeks will not cause the coronavirus to go away.  That is because the virus is circulating around the world and can be reintroduced from many different places.”

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The number of positive cases of COVID-19 has grown by another 19 in Iowa, bringing the state total to 124 confirmed cases, Gov. Kim Reynolds said today.

The latest report includes cases in Jasper County and Warren County in central Iowa. That means 30 counties in Iowa have positive cases.  Woodbury County has two confirmed cases.

 

 

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Iowa now has 105 cases of COVID-19, according to Governor Kim Reynolds.  At an afternoon press conference today, Reynolds continued to ask for non-essential workers to stay home and only leave the house for necessities.  She also talked about some new efforts to help Iowa small businesses. The governor announced an unemployment insurance tax extension to assist small businesses

FACEBOOK/Woodbury County Emergency Services

Officials with Siouxland District Health say the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Woodbury County involves a woman between the ages of 41-and-60.

“There is travel associated with this person, but it is not 100% determined that ‘yes’ this is the cause.”

That is Deputy Director of Siouxland District Health, Tyler Brock, who spoke at a news conference on Sunday. 

Health officials say because of privacy concerns they can’t say where the woman lives or where she might have visited within the county.  She is currently in self-isolation.

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds says the State Hygienic Lab now has the capacity of conducting 620 tests.  The announcement comes as public health officials announced one new case of coronavirus in the state, bringing the total positive cases here to 45. 

There has been a shortage of tests nationwide.

Reynolds says the state is working with private companies to try and come up with solutions for shortages in medical supplies.  Reynolds admits she doesn’t know the number of ventilators available in the state but the state is working on the problem.

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Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds has signed an emergency declaration designed to offer an array of relief to state residents as efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus also slow the economy. 

The state public health emergency declaration, among other things, temporarily suspends collection of property taxes, some home evictions, and certain regulation fees and penalties. It also allows bars and restaurants to sell unopened bottles of alcohol for consumption off-premises. 

  

Iowa now has 44 positive COVID-19 cases. 

The governor made the announcement at a press conference this afternoon. Yesterday the count was 38 cases of COVID-19 in Iowa.  The respiratory illness is caused by the novel coronavirus.  Reynolds said all Iowans are committed to preventing the spread of the virus.  She also talked about efforts to support the state’s small businesses.

Iowa now has 44 positive COVID-19 cases. 

The governor made the announcement at a press conference this afternoon. Yesterday the count was 38 cases of COVID-19 in Iowa.  The respiratory illness is caused by the novel coronavirus.  Reynolds said the state and all Iowans are committed to preventing the spread of the virus.  She also talked about efforts to support the state’s small businesses.

Iowa now has 44 positive COVID-19 cases as of this afternoon. 

The governor gave the update during a press conference today. The previous count, yesterday, had Iowa with 38 cases of COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the novel coronavirus.  Reynolds said the state and all Iowans are committed to preventing the spread of the virus.

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Most court proceedings in Iowa are on hold to prevent the spread of the coronavirus — but county clerk of court offices remain open to deal with legal emergencies.

State Court Administrator Todd Nuccio says they are keeping a narrow scope, focusing on emergency matters. He says the court system continues to accept all kinds of filings, but new in-person trials won’t be scheduled until early May.

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