Siouxland Public Media Interviews and Features

Weekday mornings at 7:50
  • Hosted by Steve Smith, Mark Munger, Ally Karsyn, and Mary Hartnett

We talk with the people in our community who are making art, news, music, and more. 

Support for Check It Out comes from Avery Brothers.

Jim Schaap

There’s some debate about exactly why Chief Black Hawk left Iowa in 1832 and crossed the mighty Mississippi. He claimed that he and his band had been robbed of their homeland, and all he ever wanted was to return to the land where his ancestors were buried.

That claim may have been deceptive. Some historians believe he wanted to build a Native Confederacy. More and more white faces were showing up on land that once belonged to the tribes who trapped and hunted the lush woodlands along the Rock, the Pecatonica, and the mighty Mississipi.

Cultural Continuum 9.13.19

Sep 13, 2019

The Clay County Fair wraps up, an Art in the Park at Latham Park, Chicago Blues at Vangarde, Pork and Bands at The Fruited Plain and the sport of Kings comes to South Sioux City.

Pinkerton's Detective Agency / Wikimedia Commons

For the record, the Rock Island Express the boys hit that night was eight cars long--four coaches, two sleepers, and two baggage and express cars. It left Council Bluffs at five, on a run to Chicago. Oddly enough, the last sleeper was full of Chinese students on their way to colleges out east. The date was July 21, 1873.

Cultural Continuum 9-06-19

Sep 6, 2019

Harpsichordist, Jory Viniour kicks off the Morningside College Piano recital series, there are loads of chances to get outside with road trips and walks and golf tournaments and poker runs and do you like coffee? The Mary Treglia Community Garden can hook you up this Sunday.

Coming up on The Exchange, we have an update on the continuing concern over the Renewable Fuel Waivers that have reduced the amount of corn-based ethanol that is mixed into the nation’s gasoline.  It is hurting farmers and ethanol producers.  

We talk with North Dakota State Agriculture Economist David Ripplinger, who says exporting more ethanol to Brazil will be of some help, the problem of ethanol waivers remains. 

Also, we talk with an instructor from Morningside College about new Spanish textbook that mixes in culture with grammar.

In honor of September being Library Card Sign-up MonthJenn & Kelsey reflect on the impact library cards has had throughout their lives. As well as the many benefits a library card can grant a user. 

Thomas Tran / National Resources Conservation Service

Hattie says that just before her mother got married, she’d left the farm to start working in a grocery in Springfield, SD, where some young men “seemed suddenly to have a greater hunger for candy and cigars.” One of those young men would become Hattie’s father, who, she says, in all candor, “had need of a girl like this." 

A century ago, when a man got to a certain age, and he came to know he’d better get somebody to help with chores--a man needed to get a wife like he needed to get a haircut. 

This week on The Exchange, we remember Capt. Al Haynes, the pilot who saved more than 180 passengers aboard United Flight 232 30 years ago.  He died Sunday.

We catch up with Neligh, Nebraska farmer Art Tanderup and discuss the likelihood of the TC Energy Pipeline being built after a court ruling prevented a move that would have delayed the project.  Tanderup gave some of the land destined for the pipeline to the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska for the planting of their sacred corn.

Ron Sterling / Wikimedia Commons

Maybe you've heard. As unlikely as it seems, trees may be our saviors. Researchers have determined we could plant 2.5 billion acres of new trees without losing an inch of farmland or cutting back at all on urban sprawl. Those billions of trees—take a deep breath here--can sweep up and away 200 gigatons of the carbon that's warming us dangerously. As Margaret Renkl said in a recent Times Opinion piece, "Planting trees. . .could go a long way toward saving us from ourselves."

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