Sioux City, A Shared History

Mondays at 7:45 a.m. and 4:44 p.m.

Jim Schaap, the beloved storyteller behind Small Wonders, will be our skilled guide.

Each week, travel to the times and events that make Siouxland special, that shaped our history. Listen as Dr. Schaap weaves the threads of these individual tales into the canvas that paints the picture of our times… of our Shared History.

Or follow the clues of the beautiful billboards brought to you by Avery Brothers to remind you to check in here. 

Join us, at 7:45 a.m. and 4:44 p.m. on Monday's. And bookmark this page to hear these anytime! 

Special thanks to Avery Brothers for their stunning efforts, and their great enthusiasm to make this project possible for the people of our region.

To be sure, there was a good reason for the Poncas to cut the deal they did with the strange emissary who showed up one day from Washington. He’d come to let them know  that “the Great Father” wanted the Poncas to move from their homeland on the Missouri River, to Indian Country, what would become Oklahoma, to a place where, he claimed, they’d be safe from raids by larger and more warlike neighbors.

Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs

It’s near to nine, the evening of May 2, 1879. The courtroom is standing room only. It’s the second day of a trial that pits a weary band of indigenous people against a massive law-and-order government. 

The Omaha courtroom features the famous Indian fighter, Brigadier General George Crook, who often took to the military field in buckskin, civilian togs. But today he's donned his full-dress uniform. Just three years earlier the nation’s celebrations at its own big centennial commemoration were muted by bloodletting at Little Big Horn. 

Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs

“Warm County,” the Poncas called it--Indian Territory, what would become Oklahoma—didn’t sit well for the Poncas, didn’t feel at all like home, and offered no rest for the weary, just another hard-core stretch of hunger and sickness. Weary and hungry when they arrived, they stayed weary and hungry for months.

Forget every cavalry vs. Indian show you ever saw—get it out of your consciousness. The Ponca story is not like them.

There’d never, ever been a hostile problem with the Poncas. They’d signed a treaty sixty years before, so when the mounted cavalry from Ft. Randall came riding into the Ponca villages, no Ponca had ever seen the army before. Can you imagine?

The wailing that whole night was robust. No one wanted to leave. The next morning, in come these fighting men with guns and swords.

Seth K. Humphrey / Wikimedia Commons

To be sure, there was a good reason for the Poncas to cut the deal they did with the strange emissary who showed up one day from Washington. He’d come to let them know  that “the Great Father” wanted the Poncas to move from their homeland on the Missouri River, to Indian Country, what would become Oklahoma, to a place where, he claimed, they’d be safe from raids by larger and more warlike neighbors.