Pride Events, Hedwig, Do We Need a New Jail? The Exchange, 05.29.19

May 29, 2019

Hedwig and the Angry Inch

Exchange 052919

Coming up next on The Exchange,

Soybean farmers continue to hope for a break in the weather, facing soggy fields and chilly days,  They also have hopes that a new North American trade agreement will help them sell their crops in the midst of an ongoing trade war with China.

Also, some of the issues surrounding a possible new jail in Woodbury County. 

This weekend the rock opera “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” takes the stage for the first time in Sioux City at Vanguarde Arts this weekend.  Hear from the director of the show Kathy Banta and “Hedwig” Jessie Case  

Also, a preview of the Siouxland Pride Events that begin this week and we look forward to Food Truck Fridays which begin this week.  

And a Memorial Day offering from Bob Protexter

That and more coming up on The Exchange Wednesday at noon and Friday at 9:00 a.m.

Introduction

You’re listening to The Exchange on SPM, I’m Mary Hartnett.  

Soybean farmers are dealing with two problems lately: soggy ground that prevents them from planting and the ongoing tariff war with China. More than a year ago, China put retaliatory tariffs on commodities like corn, and soybeans after the Trump administration put high tariffs on products like steel and aluminum. Since then, many soybean farmers have had a hard time finding a market to sell their crop.  However, a gleam of hope came from Canada and Mexico this week. 

Canada took a first step toward ratifying a new North American trade agreement on Monday just three days ahead of U.S. Vice President Mike Pence’s trip to Ottawa to discuss the passage of the treaty.  Chuck White is a soybean farmer in Spencer and he is the regional representative for the Iowa Soybean Association.  When asked about the value of the US-Canada-Mexico Trade Deal, White said 

Chuck White Soybean Farmer/Wx/Tariffs

That was Chuck White, a soybean farmer and a member of the Iowa Soybean Association. White says he hopes that US-Canada-Mexico trade deal goes forward successfully to help farmers sell soybeans.  White is also hopeful that President Donald Trump will come to terms with the Chinese a broker a deal that will end a trade war that has been going on for more than a year.  And, he and other farmers across the Midwest just want it to stop raining so they can get their crops in. 

You’re listening to The Exchange, on SPM, I’m MH.  The Woodbury County Supervisors have been discussing the need to repair the current jail or to build a new, better facility. Chair of the board Keith Radig says it would cost a lot to fix the jail, but it would not create more space in the already crowded facility.  Major Tony Wingert commands Field Services to include the jail and patrol divisions. Wingert says from what he’s been told, the space issue is a key factor in the decision to build a new jail. 

Tony Wingert/Jail

That was Major Tony Wingert, who commands field services for the Woodbury County Jail and patrol divisions, talking about the possible need for a new jail in the county.   

While space and a bad HVAC system are top reasons for many in the county leadership to want a new jail, others are concerned that just building a bigger jail won’t do anything to help keep people out of jail. And race is often a factor.  Nationally, Iowa is ranked very high when it comes to the percentage of African Americans who are arrested and jailed in the population. 

Daniel Zeno is a legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Iowa.  Zeno says a high proportion of the minority population ends up jailed for crimes like drug possession.

Here in Woodbury County, there has been talk about building a new bigger jail and getting some federal funds to defray the cost, housing immigrants detained by the federal government.

Daniel Zeno is a legal director for the ACLU of Iowa.  He explained some of the disparities experienced by African Americans and other minorities in Iowa’s legal system.  In terms of disparities in county and city jails, the city of Bettendorf has the highest disparity, with African Americans being arrested at nearly 10 times the rate of other races, according to a study done by USA Today and the Des Moines Register.  The rate in Des Moines was also 10 times higher.  By comparison, African Americans were being arrested at three times the rate of other races in Sioux City, two times higher county-wide.  

You’re listening to The Exchange on SPM, I’m MH. 

Starting Friday, the Siouxland Pride Festivities begin.   The Siouxland Pride Alliance and Sioux City Pride will host two weeks of LGBTQ Pride events to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising.  Don Dew, the Executive Director of the Siouxland Disability Resource Center and Karen Mackey the executive director of the Siouxland Human Rights Commission organized the Pride Events. The first of  The Pride Week Festivities will kick off at 7 p.m. this Friday at Girls Inc. with the Pride Prom.  

PRIDE Festivities

That was Don Dew, the head of the Disabilities Resource Center of Siouxland and Karen Mackey the executive director of the Siouxland Human Rights Commission talking about The Pride Week Festivities that will take place in Siouxland over the next two weeks.  The Pride Prom takes place this Friday at Girls, Inc.  

This weekend a gender-bending, punk-rock musical hits the stage of Vangarde Arts in Sioux City, Iowa.  Siouxland Public Media’s Sheila Brummer talked to two people instrumental in this theatrical production

TAG: “Hedwig (head-wig) and the Angry” Inch opens on Saturday night, June 1st and runs for three nights at Vangarde Arts.  For tickets and more information go to vangardearts.com

You’re listening to The Exchange, I'm Mary Hartnett.   You can tell its summer in Sioux city because this Friday Food Truck Fridays begins. The summer-long food truck and music events are every Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m at the Pearl Street Park across from the Launchpad Children's Museum.  Sam Burrish is a volunteer organizer for the event. 

Food Truck Fridays

That was Sam Burrish, one of the organizers of Sioux City’s Food Truck Fridays, which begin this Saturday at the Pearl Street Park at 620 Pearl Street from 11:00 to 1:30 over the noon hour.  There is a roster of two dozen trucks who will be selling food and drink over the summer.  And Siouxland Public Media is helping out with the event as well. We will have updates on the music you can expect to hear on food truck Fridays.  

INTRO:  On Memorial Day, we remembered the sacrifice of those who served our country in the U.S. military.  A Sioux City man shared a special story he wrote in honor of his father’s service.

Here’s “This is My Father’s Flag” with Bob Protexter, produced by Siouxland Public Media’s Sheila Brummer.

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