Noon Newscast 6.24.19

Jun 24, 2019

Deadline for FEMA assistance is July 1st
Credit Siouxland Public Media

People in nine Iowa counties hit hardest by flooding this spring have one more week to register with the federal agency tasked with disaster recovery.

Woodbury and Monona counties are part of that disaster declaration.

Registering with the Federal Emergency Management Agency can help homeowners and renters get grants to repair their home or pay for temporary housing. Deanna Frazier    is a spokeswoman for FEMA.

“We are receiving more registrations that are kind of trickling in rather than busting down our doors right now, however we do believe that there are people out there that have not registered with FEMA for assistance.”

The U.S. Small Business Administration also offers low-interest loans for homeowners.

The deadline to register is July 1st.

Over the weekend clean water advocates and experts gathered for the first ever Iowa Water Festival to promote water quality issues in the state.

The Environmental Working Group recently reported Iowa sees more cases of cancer because of nitrate pollution in drinking water.

A public health expert at the University of Iowa says this is because of the use of large amounts of fertilizer used in agricultures.

The event took place in Des Moines on Saturday.

If you travel to the Henry Doorly Zoo this summer you can check out two newborn sea lion pups in the zoo's Sea Lion Pavilion.

The first pup was born June 12 to 9-year-old Gemini. Another was born on Tuesday to Coco, who was born at Omaha's Zoo and Aquarium in June 2009.

The sexes of the pups are currently unknown. The sea lion pups and their mothers are currently on display with the father of both pups, 15-year-old Chino.

The zoo currently has eight sea lions: two males, four females and the two pups.

Next year, the zoo is set to open Owen Sea Lion Shores, a new sea lion habitat that will include underwater viewing.

The area also will include a natural beach that will allow females to give birth on land and gradually introduce pups to the water as they would in their natural habitats.