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Flooding SE South Dakota Still Disrupting Homes, Schools

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Flooding from the torrential rain that's soaked much of southeastern South Dakota closed schools for a second day today submerged city streets and caused some to evacuate their homes. In Brandon, northeast of Sioux Falls, the heavy rain turned the local golf course into a lake. 

The cities of Mitchell, Dell Rapids and Madison have been hit especially hard with the area receiving more than 7 inches of rain over two days.

Airbnb is offering its Open Homes Program to people who are displaced because of recent tornadoes and flooding in South Dakota.

Hosts in South Dakota and nearby states can list their homes at no cost to people in need via the Air BNB website, the online lodging site announced.

The program is being offered through October 4 and is available to those in need in South Dakota and surrounding states. It 

Sioux City has been working to get its drinking water back to compliance after violating a drinking water standard for disinfection byproducts. 

Water samples collected mid-August showed one of Sioux City’s eight testing sites was a little bit higher than the Environmental Protection Agency’s standard for trihalomethanes. These form when disinfectants like chlorine are used to take out pathogens from drinking water.

Sioux City’s Water Plant Superintendent Brad Puetz (Pitz) says the city put out a notice to inform the public about the violation.

We don’t feel that there are any immediate health risks for anybody.

Health effects like cancer can happen after long term exposure to these chemicals. The city will continue to take samples to monitor the water. And it started pulling water from deeper wells.

Which cools the water down, reduces the number of organics in the water that can react with the chlorine. 

Puetz (Pitz) adds he believes the Missouri River’s high levels were a factor, along with warmer water temps and more organic compounds in the water. 

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