Siouxland Public Media Interviews and Features

Weekday mornings at 7:50
  • Hosted by Steve Smith, Mark Munger, Ally Karsyn, and Mary Hartnett

We talk with the people in our community who are making art, news, music, and more. 

Andrew Russo

Andrew Russo, a finalist in the Van Cliburn Piano Competition as well as a graduate of the accliamed Julliard School of music with further studies abroad in Leipzig and Paris, will perform in Eppley Auditorium this weekend. During my Skype interview, he remarked upon his excitement for the opportunity to retun to Sioux City to perform. In referance to the recital series, Russo said, "I think that having theses outlets for people to hear great music is important."  

Cultural Continuum 10-12-18

11 hours ago

If downtown smells particularly good on your drive home, it's probably Artilicious at the Sioux City Art Center. Morningside College Piano Recital Series is back in action this weekend and there's a steady stream of things happening at the Dorothy Pecaut Nature Center.

The Exchange 101018

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News

BBComingup next on The Exchange, we hear from the candidates for the Woodbury County Board of Supervisors and two of the candidates for the County treasures office.

The main issue on the supervisor's race is still the switch from Sioux Rivers Mental Health and Disabilities Service Region to Rolling Hills.  Flora spoke out against the move.

Mathew Ung has long been in favor of joining Rolling Hills

We also hear about a new effort engage our youngest children and talk with Pianist Andrew Russo.

Today I would like to recommend one of my favorite classic novels, North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell. First published in 1855, this story follows Margaret Hale as she is uprooted from her comfortable home in the South of England when her father leaves his employment as a minister. They find themselves in Milton, and Northern industrial mill town where Margaret is initially repulsed by the ugliness of her new surroundings.

Cultural Continuum 10-05-18

Oct 5, 2018

This is the last weekend to check out the National Music Museum for awhile, college theater at Morningside and Wayne, there's a smattering of hikes and an Elvis (Costello) collaborator, which is way different than an Elvis impersonator.

Sioux City Art Center

"The best way of approaching every experience that you have on a daily basis is with a freshness, with an openness, and to try to make sense of what is in front of you, rather than bringing all or your preconceptions to something," says Todd Behrens, curator at the Sioux City Art Center while looking at DELL (ray), a work by James Shrosbree, a painting that welcomes its viewers by first rejecting their past experiences.

Support for Check It Out comes from Avery Brothers.  

Cultural Continuum 9-28-18

Sep 28, 2018

The Sioux City Symphony Orchestra takes us to a galaxy far, far away...not that long from now, actually as they open the 2018-2019 season with Star Wars - A New Hope this weekend. We've got theater covering everything from Frankenstein to Junie B. Jones and you can't throw a rock without hitting some kind of mineral or fossil show this weekend.

Sean Grennan

"I'm trying to make sense of this thing we have, this life we do," Sean Grennan, author of Now and Then, tells us. The play, which is running through September 30th at Lamb Arts Regional Theatre, found its beginning when the word "enouement" caught Grennan's eye. As a young man, an unknown word like this may have caused pause, a slight stumble, perhaps, in a brisk walk. In his early 60's, though, it was full stop.

Sioux City Art Center

"[At the center of the painting] there seems to be this infinite space... at the same time, when you start to look at everything else on the canvas, those areas also reveal a different kind of a depth, because it's depth through multiple layers of things."  Ex-Voto by Susan Chrysler White demonstrates how a flat canvas can reveal the complexities of us and things much bigger than us. The painting is part of the Sioux City Art Center's Permanent Collection and can be seen now on display in the Permanent Collection On View exhibition. 

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